Thursday, July 29, 2010

Field trip to Wimberger's bakery

Posted By on Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 4:21 PM

People apparently like introducing a food critic to some local treasure he's missed.

But playing Pied Piper to two food critics? Seems they love that.

Bryce Crawford and I learned this last week when Blue Star/Nosh/La'au's owner Joe Coleman basically freaked the capital-F out on us last week — some wild gesturing was involved — when we confessed that neither of us had been to, or could at that moment even recall having heard about, Wimberger's Old World Bakery.

Why have you also possibly not seen this sign before? Well ... the residential/industrial stretch of Bott Avenue on the west side doesnt exactly scream aweome foodie spot.
  • Matthew Schniper
  • How might you have missed this sign before? Well ... the residential/industrial stretch of Bott Avenue on the west side doesn't exactly scream "awesome foodie spot."

Yes — it has been around for more than 40 years, and I did later recall that our own Monika Mitchell Randall had written in December 2008 about purchasing holiday stollen from the outfit.

And for no good reason whatsoever, neither Bryce nor I could justify why we'd never stopped by the market or bakery. Could be the location — tucked in a residential neighborhood in an unlikely spot for a retail eatery.

Sandwich building starts here.
  • Matthew Schniper
  • Sandwich-building starts here.

So Coleman, who claims to shop at Wimberger's weekly, insisted on taking us for our first visit, which we made around lunchtime today. Once inside, he made straight for a deli rack where he nabbed us the last two apple strudel. Then, from a bread kiosk, he began shoving pretzel rolls into a plastic bag with a maniacal grin.

We toured racks of specialty import items, mainly from Germany, that included chocolates, gourmet canned fish and a variety of dry goods. A long deli case sported all types of cheeses, deli meats and traditional sausages. I also noticed a sign advertising Reuben sandwiches with a bag of chips for $4.99 — must return for that.

Now you know what to say when someone stops you on the street and says, Hey, can you point me in the direction of the nearest Fleischkaese?
  • Matthew Schniper
  • Now you know what to say when someone stops you on the street and says, 'Hey, can you point me in the direction of the nearest Fleischkaese?'

At a stone table outside, we broke bread together and discovered "this world class item that's right here in Colorado Springs," as Coleman puts it. Indeed, neither Bryce nor I could argue that we'd had a finer pretzel roll anywhere — not that I've had many. The salty outside, as you might assume, bears a harder crust, but it splits to reveal a super-soft and fluffy inside. It reminded me a little bit of the interior of a good loaf of challah bread, minus the eggy taste.

The apple strudels were also ideal studies into the art of pastry making, with delicate, flaky shells and lovely spiced apple wedges tucked into a mild cream filling.

So, for today, the match goes to Mr. Coleman ... we stand schooled on the deserving destination that is Wimberger's.

Anyone else wanna play stump the foodies?

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