Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Air Force hopes to fix water contamination problem

Posted By on Tue, Jul 5, 2016 at 4:24 PM

click to enlarge Members of Team Pete take the oath as they are reenlisted by Lt. Col. Chris Hammond, U.S. Air Force Thunderbird’s commander and leader, on Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 31, 2016. The Thunderbirds are in Colorado preparing to take part in a flyover at the United States Air Force Academy graduation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm)
  • Members of Team Pete take the oath as they are reenlisted by Lt. Col. Chris Hammond, U.S. Air Force Thunderbird’s commander and leader, on Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 31, 2016. The Thunderbirds are in Colorado preparing to take part in a flyover at the United States Air Force Academy graduation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amber Grimm)
In the wake of serious contamination problems with the water supply in the Security, Widefield and Fountain areas, Peterson Air Force Base has issued a news release outlining efforts to hire a "rapid response" contractor to treat drinking water.

The actions comes after discovery that wells in those areas are contaminated with perfluorochemicals believed to come from the base. Here's the full release:
With the ongoing investigation into perfluorochemicals in the Security, Fountain and Widefield watershed, the Air Force has awarded a $4.3 million rapid response contract as an interim measure to treat drinking water.

"This proactive measure is being taken as a good neighbor approach while the investigation continues," said Lt. Col. Chad Gemeinhardt, 21st Civil Engineer Squadron commander.

The money will be used to evaluate affected potable water systems and develop short-term treatment solutions. The treatment system is expected to be granulated activated carbon filters installed in the affected potable water systems to remove PFCs from drinking water. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will meet with El Paso County Health, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment, Air Force Civil Engineer Center and water district representatives July 6 to determine the best course of action.

Additionally, Peterson Air Force Base officials requested and received an expedited date for further investigation as a possible source of the chemicals. The site investigation contractor will arrive at Peterson July 7, to determine best locations to drill monitoring wells. The wells will determine source and extent of the contamination, if any is found. Drilling will begin in October 2016 and an internal draft report from the contractor is expected in March 2017. Soil samples will also be collected and sampled for PFCs to try and determine the source, according to Air Force Civil Engineer Center officials. The base was originally scheduled for further testing in May 2017, but testing was moved up to October 2016 based on the request.

PFCs are a class of man-made chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products such as nonstick cookware, waterproof fabric and some food packaging. PFCs have been used for many years to make products that resist heat, stains, grease and water.

"We take environmental concerns seriously including those that could impact our neighbors and communities," Gemeinhardt said. "We are fully cooperating in the investigation and want to help quickly find and resolve the matter.

"After a preliminary assessment was received in June, we requested follow-up testing be moved to the soonest date possible," he said.

Peterson AFB provides airport firefighting and emergency services to the city of Colorado Springs in exchange for leased property from the city, and are the first responders for any aircraft or medical emergency on airport property.

Peterson AFB used aqueous film forming foam, or AFFF, in joint fire training on Peterson AFB, where fire departments from across the region used the training sites to adequately prepare for emergency response actions to provide public safety. The AFFF was used in a legal, responsible manner in full compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines at the time.

An industry-standard fire suppressant used to extinguish flammable liquid fires such as jet fuel fires, the foam was used from 1970 until about 1990 when Peterson fire fighters began training in a lined basin using water to fight a controlled propane-fueled fire, which provides realistic firefighting conditions in an environmentally-safe and controlled manner. Since developing the new lined training area, AFFF has only been used in emergency response situations.

"This is our home too. We have Airmen living all along the Front Range, including the Fountain, Widefield and Security area," Gemeinhardt said, "so this is a very real concern for us."

"We are working with the Air Force Civil Engineer Center, the Environmental Protection Agency, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment, El Paso County, the City of Colorado Springs, the Colorado Springs Airport, and other partners to determine the way ahead on this issue," he said.

In addition to providing the filtration assistance and receiving an accelerated testing schedule, officials here are double checking aircraft hangar fire suppression systems for residual PFCs, and continuing the investigation into past PFC use at Peterson AFB. Fire officials here are also replacing their current stock of AFFF with a newer EPA-compliant synthetic foam.

Various Air Force representatives, including wing leadership, civil and bioenvironmental engineers, will be at the El Paso County Public Health town hall meeting scheduled at 6 p.m. July 7 at the Mesa Ridge High School auditorium, to help answer questions about the investigation.

Tags: , ,

Favorite

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

Latest in IndyBlog

Top Topics in IndyBlog

City Gov (12)


Local News (11)


Food & Drink (4)


Military (3)


Elections (3)


Recent Comments

All content © Copyright 2016, The Colorado Springs Independent   |   Website powered by Foundation