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Comment Archives: Stories: Stage

Re: “Practically perfect

Thanks for the update, Warren, we've changed the capsule.

Posted by Edie Adelstein on 12/18/2014 at 10:56 AM

Re: “Practically perfect

Due to popular demand, we've extended the run through Jan. 11! But tickets won't last long.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Warren Epstein 1 on 12/17/2014 at 9:36 AM

Re: “Potion play

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Posted by Stacey Xavi on 11/24/2014 at 4:57 AM

Re: “Makeup case

"Men do figure into the women's lives in Love, but as accessories like cuff links, not as meaningful companions."

Are you familiar with the Bechdel test, by any chance? Wikipedia: "...the Bechdel test was introduced in Alison Bechdel's comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For. In a 1985 strip titled "The Rule", an unnamed female character says that she only watches a movie if it satisfies the following requirements:

1. It has to have at least two women in it,
2. who talk to each other,
3. about something besides a man."

When you begin to apply this test to theatre, television or film, you will find that disturbingly few pieces pass it, and you begin to view entertainment and what it tells us about how interested (or not) our society is in the inner life of women in a much different (read: bleaker) light. Indeed, the scarcity of plays in which there are roles for several women - especially women over 30 - instead of two romantic rivals or one mother and one ingenue is still, even in this day and age, very disappointing. LLAWIW is one of a handful in which your statement is true; it's the exception, not the rule. Thank goodness (and female playwrights) for the few that exist and manage to make it into production.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dylan-Beth We-areLennox Clements-Mosley on 09/30/2014 at 9:13 PM

Re: “From Bach to burlesque

Yay Peaks and Pasties, and Yay Broken Glass Photography!!!

Posted by Wyldesage on 08/28/2014 at 6:34 PM

Re: “In opening weekend for two plays, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? soars

I think you were too hard on Floyd and Clea. The singing voices and acting were fine. The play is very talky which makes it feel slow. But it wasn't that painful. The songs were not memorable, but they did move the story along. It was an enjoyable evening.

Posted by joannev on 06/20/2014 at 9:42 AM

Re: “The Butler Did It! goes for the clichés, and gets away with murder

Bill Wheeler writes a review of opening night on his theatre blog:
http://theatercolorado.blogspot.com/2014/0…

Posted by Nancy Holaday on 06/06/2014 at 3:49 PM

Re: “Venice meets SoCal in a revamped Italian classic at TheatreWorks

Brilliant production. All of the actors and actresses were absolutely brilliant!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Pegi Haggerty-Schlis on 04/29/2014 at 4:42 PM
Posted by Bill W. on 03/24/2014 at 5:03 PM

Re: “Two tortured everymen enliven stage stories from other eras

Nobody in our town's theater community could have more respect for Christian O'Shaughnessy, with whom I've had the pleasure to work, Ashley Crockett, my theater pal of many productions, and others of this fine cast and crew who have given themselves so professionally to this project. But there has come a time in my life, like now, where the heat and fires of my once young self have cooled. And now, I do not need nor want to be "...led on a spree of choreographed violence." I will give this production a miss, not for any lack of respect for those involved, but to find fewer assaults on my senses of horror, violence, and anarchy.

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Christopher Lowell on 03/12/2014 at 2:16 PM

Re: “Review: It's a Wonderful Life at TheatreWorks goes sweet and sanitized

To the writer:

I can't comment on the main body of this review since I haven't seen this show, but I am uniquely qualified to comment on the last paragraph. I'm the communications director at our town's largest performing arts organization. The administrative folks at TheatreWorks are probably too polite to respond, so I'll attempt to offer a thought here.

The entire business of theatre, and indeed, performing arts in general, is based on a public-private partnership, wherein sponsors provide support in order to make the cost of tickets more accessible and make the art produced on the stage possible. Disparaging TheatreWorks' method of recognizing that sponsorship (and possibly causing the sponsor to feel alienated) demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of the performance arts industry and the sources of funding for our efforts. Like it or not, both corporate and individual sponsors play a vital role in the quality, frequency, and accessibility of arts throughout the United States. This is particularly true in Colorado Springs, where public funding is extremely limited. Using this public forum as an artistic reviewer to complain about that system is highly questionable since administrative decisions don't usually fall within the scope of a critic's responsibility.

There is a point at which sponsor recognition can be overbearing and obtrusive, but it's difficult to imagine a scenario in which TheatreWorks, with their artistic sensibilities, would be prone to that level of promotion for the sponsor.

Finally, I'll just mention that it's especially odd to have that final paragraph, given that this very publication, the Independent, is a primary supporter of arts throughout our region, including TheatreWorks. I can imagine that the Indy genuinely appreciates the recognition that it receives for its support of the performing arts, and it's perplexing that you would disparage TheatreWorks' efforts in this regard.

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by natec16 on 12/17/2013 at 4:25 PM

Re: “Review: It's a Wonderful Life at TheatreWorks goes sweet and sanitized

Just about all of the big movies of the 40s were also performed on the radio by the starring actors, often introduced by the movies' directors. If a movie turned into a hit it was performed again using other actors in the lead roles. The radio plays never ran more than an hour, so material was always cut. There was more than one version of The Maltese Falcon broadcast over the airwaves, including a version that runs only 30 minutes long.

Posted by Mr. K-- on 12/12/2013 at 8:19 AM

Re: “Review: It's a Wonderful Life at TheatreWorks goes sweet and sanitized

The production isn't trying to rival the movie. What theatrical production could?? A radio production of this was performed the year the movie came out; Stewart and Reed both reprised their roles in said broadcast. Do you think THAT production rivaled the movie? That's not the purpose. It's to use the radio genre to give a different twist to the story. Both can be enjoyed without detracting from either's merits. Different isn't bad, it's just different.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by USOgirl on 12/12/2013 at 7:02 AM

Re: “Review: It's a Wonderful Life at TheatreWorks goes sweet and sanitized

I wanted tickets, and tried online, but their site won't work well with my iMac.
After this review I'll just pass and watch the annual TV showing.

1 like, 5 dislikes
Posted by OldCrank on 12/11/2013 at 11:52 AM

Re: “THEATREdART strips down Milton's classic

The performance dates are slightly different from those currently listed above. The play runs from 6-28 through 7/13. We will be performing on Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 8:00pm 6/28 - 6/30 and 7/5 - 7/7, and then Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 7/11 - 7/13.

Posted by Brian Mann on 06/26/2013 at 2:56 PM

Re: “Review: Star Bar does A Streetcar Named Desire right, but leaves some elements to be desired

Yes, that's right, and our mullein is not packaged for smoking, which is why many theatrical productions use it. We used it during Cuckoo's Nest, and with the ventilation system working, no one noticed. As we pointed out before, for some people the difference between a non-carcinogenic herb and tobacco is significant, and the potential for irritation is significantly diminished with the ability to use the ventilation system. Again, I would ask you please to clarify that in next week's issue for those who may not wish to attend based on your description of the smoke problem.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by starbarplayers on 05/29/2013 at 7:48 PM

Re: “Review: Star Bar does A Streetcar Named Desire right, but leaves some elements to be desired

I did not want to get into the legality of the cigarettes because I am not an attorney, but in their ban on the public indoor smoking of tobacco products, the Colorado Revised Statutes state: "'Tobacco' also includes cloves and any other plant matter or product that is packaged for smoking." (CRS 25-14-203)

Regardless of the legality, I wanted to focus on a simpler issue. The smoke from the mullein cigarettes is likely to bother some theatergoers and they need to be aware of that ahead of time.

2 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Todd Wallinger on 05/29/2013 at 5:46 PM

Re: “Review: Star Bar does A Streetcar Named Desire right, but leaves some elements to be desired

First, Todd, let me thank you for a great review. It’s much appreciated. I wanted to say a couple of things, though.

The most important is that we’re NOT using real cigarettes. It’s illegal to smoke tobacco products in public establishments, even onstage. Telling people that is likely to keep them away from our show, and that’s not good. Instead, we’re using hand-rolled mullein which, when smoked, is used to treat respiratory ailments (http://firstways.com/2011/12/07/five-surpr…). I realize that you say you found the herbal smoke just as irritating, but for those who care about the difference, I’m hoping that after reading this you might be willing to print a retraction in next week’s edition so that it only endangers one weekend’s attendance, which, for a house our size, can mean a great deal. We planned to have the fan going, as well, but as you pointed out, the lights were using too much power. The building was wired in the 30’s, some of the wiring is unstable and it, not the crew, is having some problems handling our lights; the assumption that we would take the trouble to install all of that, which took weeks, and then not use that time to teach our board ops how to use it is just silly. I know critics have to play it close to the vest, but it wouldn’t hurt to ask about things now and again. We’ve addressed that issue now, at any rate; the lights are stable and the ventilation is back.

Regarding Blanche: I chose to interpret Blanche a little differently than some have. I don’t think she is a coquette (“a woman,” according to Merriam-Webster, “who endeavors without sincere affection to gain the attention and admiration of men”) – though she has her moments. She is deftly manipulative, to be sure, and often dishonest, but I’m not sure what you mean by coquettish; Blanche is a grown woman, not a debutante. A lady accomplished in the art of commanding male attention goes about it subtly: she certainly doesn’t have to show the effort. In my opinion, the notion that coquettishness got Blanche into trouble is a very shallow interpretation; Blanche is also a woman of penetrating intelligence, a characteristic that seems to be overlooked quite often in favor of her sexuality and personal frailties. The decline of her life has been brought on by things much darker and deeper than the empty desire to be admired. Her agenda is much more complex and a good deal more serious than that, and she tells us so.

Though Blanche is plainly unstable, I also don’t think she completely loses her grip on reality as early on as some people tend to assume. Remember: she’s not (…spoiler alert) taken away to an institution at the end because she’s crazy; she’s put there because her sister Stella doesn’t want to believe the horrible truth about her husband. It’s Stella who doesn’t want to face reality, not Blanche. The text doesn’t support the notion of her as someone who is completely, irretrievably insane. Nothing she says in the previous two scenes before she is finally taken away is actually that crazy. Some of it is lies, some is wishful thinking, some of it is truth – but she knows she’s lying when she lies. In fact, in the last scene with Mitch, just two scenes from the end, she’s more brutally honest about herself and the reality of her life and choices than she has ever been. She doesn’t let go of reality until AFTER her final confrontation with Stanley. I’ve seen very fine actresses descend into the maudlin and succumb to the impulse to ‘play crazy’ in this role, and frankly I consider it the most ham-fisted and least imaginative choice.

Tennessee’s own sister was put away and subjected to one of the first wave of an epidemic of pre-frontal lobotomies performed mostly on women, not for being insane in the true sense of the word but for having some behavioral and possibly chemical issues and for being inappropriately sexual, and he never got over what had happened to his dear Rose, whom he called “the best of us;” when you place Blanche in that context it becomes clear what he was trying to tell us about her. Mostly she’s just a desperate woman with nowhere to go, in a world which has no place for her, who uses the appeal that has gained her such admiration in the past to try to find some safety, and whose behavior becomes more outrageous and departs further and further from propriety as she fails. She may retreat into idealism or outdated notions from time to time, but in many ways Blanche is incredibly strong and much more realistic than we give her credit for. In fact, I think it’s important to consider that the trip to the asylum isn’t the end of Blanche’s story; it’s just where we leave her.

I’m not protective of my own performance as much as I am of Tennessee and of Blanche; nor am I offended by your review: you were very complimentary, and I appreciate that. I’m not so arrogant as to think that I got this exactly right: no actress ever really does; it’s far too deep and dense a role for any one performer to find and do justice to everything that Williams put into it. It’s kind of the Lear of female roles that way. Tennessee used to tell each actress he worked with on this role that she was his favorite Blanche, because there were so many ways to interpret it; each interpretation is going to focus on some of the nearly endless facets of this profoundly complex character and see them differently than another performer – or reviewer – might think they should. In the world of interactive media, however, reviews have become opportunities for interesting artistic discussions rather than the one-sided pronouncements they once were, and I think that’s great for everyone, including the audience. Criticism is an art; their work, like ours, is open for interpretation and evaluation.

There’s infinitely more to Blanche than most people who don’t delve deeply tend to see. Williams has given us a portrait of a woman of substance in serious trouble and out of control, not a weak, delusional flibbertigibbet whose vanity and flirtatiousness have brought her to a deservedly bad end. We’ve accepted a set of givens about women and sex and sanity in the past that demean and dismiss women in general and Blanche in particular. I think looking beyond that makes for a much more interesting experience.

- ACM

9 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by starbarplayers on 05/29/2013 at 2:23 PM

Re: “Review: Star Bar does A Streetcar Named Desire right, but leaves some elements to be desired

As a prop mistress for this show, I too want to clarify that real cigarettes are not being used for this production. We are using hand rolled mullein. Also, Mr. Wallinger came on a night when the building electrical shut down in the beginning of the show. He implied that the light techs might not have known what they were doing. Our light tech is indeed very capable and was having to make fixes during the show. The electrical issue has since been resolved.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jan Gregg-Kelm on 05/29/2013 at 11:26 AM

Re: “Review: Star Bar does A Streetcar Named Desire right, but leaves some elements to be desired

Thanks for your comment. The cigarettes may not be tobacco-based, but they're real in that they're lit, unlike e-cigarettes or baby powder-based stage cigarettes. To me, the smell and irritation were indistinguishable from that of tobacco cigarettes.

3 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by Todd Wallinger on 05/29/2013 at 11:26 AM

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