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Comment Archives: stories: Columns: Your Turn

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

...and the industry pushes forward like a steamroller. There are already companies that specialize in supporting the new industry like http://yourgreencontractor.com. They build green facilities in Colorado for growing it and dispensaries to sell it. The entire scenario looks to be an economic boost like the marijuana-specific tourism companies that are also sprouting up.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Michael Cordova on 02/10/2014 at 11:38 AM

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

Great article, Mark!

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Judith Posch on 02/07/2014 at 5:40 PM

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

Bach is going to have a short run, along with the council members that stated that they would "support the will of the voters" in regards to marijuana. They have failed to uphold their pre election commitments and are now holding a ticket for the next bus out of office.

15 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Are you kidding me ? on 02/07/2014 at 10:14 AM

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

Us... the voting majority, will certainly remember Bach's attitude toward cannabis and the community in general, there will be NO second term. City Council…you're next.

11 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tom McClain on 02/07/2014 at 9:28 AM

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

In a democracy, taxation is not "theft." Nevertheless, avoiding taxes while enjoying the benefits of society is hypocrisy.

12 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Mr. K-- on 02/06/2014 at 2:27 PM

Re: “Wake up and smell the weed

Overall, I'd say that's pretty good commentary, but I wouldn't begrudge anyone the opportunity to avoid having his income stolen from him by taxation, and I sense an odd attachment to this practice of theft.

Also, while supporting individual freedoms, I must note that A64 is a regulatory farce, and I'm not sure it's a good idea for your party to be advocating the related taxation and regulation. That sort of pandering to the state is why I no longer pay much attention to the LP.

3 likes, 10 dislikes
Posted by wtfk on 02/05/2014 at 3:19 PM

Re: “In our sights: Browns Canyon

Amen!!!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by TejonTech on 12/31/2013 at 2:44 PM

Re: “How we remember JFK's assassination

I remember only one thing vividly since I was very young - and that was the funeral procession. Especially the riderless horse with the backward boots and the constant drum beat. I can still recall the exact sound of that drum beat to this day.

P.S. I also remember being upset that the usual Saturday morning cartoons were not on the TV due to continuous live coverage of all the Washington DC activities (remember there were only three TV channels at the time).

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by CSIndyReader on 11/21/2013 at 11:00 AM

Re: “How we remember JFK's assassination

John . F. Kennedy’s assassination happened 50 years ago and a majority of Americans do not believe The Warren Commission Report. After 50 years of denials, free the files.

“Sunny Day in Dallas” – Gerry Segal
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRH7qTLzxvU

http://www.gerrysegal.com

0 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Gerry Segal on 11/20/2013 at 2:30 PM

Re: “We mortals should hate war

Who got paid for the Iraq war??? When political families (Bush & Chaney) make money off of war, their will be no end of war in sight!

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by gurudori on 11/12/2013 at 1:00 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

“Don’t read any more of these [constituents’ emails] than you absolutely have to.” is precisely what Morse stated on the Rachel Maddow show. Feel free to view the video yourself to see the quote and the reference to what he was talking about Bill Guman.

The author states that guns continue to get more deadly, but a .44 magnum today is not much different than a .44 magnum 100 years ago except for the smokeless powder. But that is not something that is changing continuously. And a .44 slug is a .44 slug.

What has changed is the moral fiber of society along with increasing gun control. In general, in the US, it has been shown that more lax gun laws and allowing more law abiding citizens to have guns decreases crime and gun violence. But let's not confuse people's emotional response with facts.

7 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Rob Harris on 09/24/2013 at 5:04 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

BTW, happyfew, the actual story, which is still wrong, was NOT that he was denied an AR-15 because of a background check as many like you incorrectly assert. The original story was that he was denied an AR-15 because he was from out of state. However, the state does not have such a law regarding AR-15s.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/s…

In fact, the NY Times finally corrected their misstatement saying "Correction: September 20, 2013
An article on Wednesday about the gunman in the Navy Yard shooting, using information from senior law enforcement officials, misstated a provision in Virginia state gun law. Out-of-state buyers must provide additional forms of identification to purchase a high-capacity AR-15 rifle; the laws do not prohibit the sales of all AR-15 rifles to all out-of-state residents."

Since the gunman had not only a driver's license, but also a US military issued CAC, he would have had more than enough ID.

Even Vanity Fair had to correct themselves: "Update, 3:00 p.m.: A lawyer for the firearms store in question tells Talking Points Memo that “Mr. Alexis did not attempt to buy an AR-15 from Sharpshooters Small Arms Range. He asked about purchasing a handgun (no brand specified) but he was told that he could not purchase a handgun except for delivery to his home state through another Federally-licensed firearm dealer. He then decided to purchase the Remington 870 express shotgun.”"

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dave H on 09/20/2013 at 5:35 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

Correction:

"He attempted to buy an AR 15 but was denied due to a state law because he was checked." -- happyfew

Incorrect, happyfew. The background check for an AR-15 and for a pump shotgun are exactly the same. If he was denied for one, he would have been denied for the other. He passed the background check for the shotgun; therefore he could not have been denied for the AR-15.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dave H on 09/20/2013 at 5:19 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

"5) The background check for an AR-15 and for a shotgun is exactly the same"

WRONG!

He attempted to buy an AR 15 but was denied due to a state law because he was checked... A very good state law, almost inarguable after this lesson.

0 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by happyfew on 09/20/2013 at 2:46 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

"Granted, most of my knowledge on the subject comes from bad Vin Diesel movies, but still..." -- Warren Epstein 1

You are not alone. What most people have learned about firearms is a mixture of hearsay, urban legends/myths, what the gun controllers tell them, and what they see in movies and on TV shows. At least 70% of what is shown on TV and in the movies is wrong. It can be so bad that sometimes it actually gets annoying to watch TV shows and movies (though sometimes the mistakes are funny). There used to even be a USENET group (if you remember USENET) which compiled running lists of errors in shows.

This is part of the reason a lot of bad laws get passed.

I can put you in touch with a guy who is pretty good at teaching some of the basics without any NRA propaganda if you want. He has done this for a few reporters in the past.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dave H on 09/20/2013 at 12:55 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

"We can make smart bombs that can drop into chimneys, but we haven't made advancements in gun technology? " -- Warren Epstein 1

Pretty much. The tech used in firearms has really not changed much since in about 100 years. Semi-autos are over 100 years old. Smokeless powder and center-fire cartridges are also very old. Machine guns are very old. We have improved some of the materials used, tweaked things here and there, but there have not really been major changes since John Moses Browning's time.

7 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Dave H on 09/20/2013 at 12:31 PM

Re: “A message from the middle

Really?

We can make smart bombs that can drop into chimneys, but we haven't made advancements in gun technology?

Granted, most of my knowledge on the subject comes from bad Vin Diesel movies, but still...

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by Warren Epstein 1 on 09/20/2013 at 11:56 AM

Re: “A message from the middle

"And yet your arguments all say "no." No to gun control."" - Warren Epstein 1

My argument is that while some gun control may be necessary and even advisable, specifically the ones that address behavior, a lot of gun control addresses the object. Gun control laws which target the behavior like the misuse of firearms are generally fine. These laws do not burden the law abiding, are enforceable, and do not restrict the object itself. Gun control laws which target the object are generally not good.

Sarin gas is a WMD (nuclear, chemical, or biological weapon or extremely large conventional explosive -- usually greater than 2,000 lbs of TNT equivalent). As such, it is not addressed by the Second Amendment. You are engaging in what has become known as "the nuke argument".

"and where to draw the line on the access to increasingly powerful weaponry."

The power of the weaponry really hasn't changed much in the last 50+ years -- longer actually. There have been small advances here and there, but nothing major.

5 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Dave H on 09/20/2013 at 11:44 AM

Re: “A message from the middle

Dave,

You repeat excellent arguments about gun control. You say absolutists are rare, and I'm inferring that you're not among them. And yet your arguments all say "no." No to gun control." They all say to me that we shouldn't be having this discussion about weapons. And I'm not disagreeing that the nature of violence goes beyond the tools used, but the tools, at some point, become important.

Now, if your neighbor had a stash of serin gas, the fact that he was also a violent criminal would be a bad thing -- but I'd be really freakin concerned about that gas. We have plenty of violent criminals around, and the causes of violence need to be explored. But wouldn't you be focused on the poison gas that could wipe out our city?

I use this ridiculous extreme example (and you could use the police state example for the other side of this freedom-vs.-authority argument), to point out that sometimes it's access to the weapons themselves that is the issue.

And I'm not even trying to argue for gun control. Only for the idea that we might set our entrenched ideologies aside to have a meaningful discussion about how and where to draw the line on the access to increasingly powerful weaponry.

I haven't heard many folks on either side say this would be OK, but this would be too far.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Warren Epstein 1 on 09/20/2013 at 10:14 AM

Re: “A message from the middle

"the reason I dismiss the old "guns don't kill people" saw is because it's both cliche and simplistic. " -- Warren Epstein 1

Cliche and simplistic, but true.

You want simplistic? Focusing on a misused object is simplistic and oh so typical of our instant gratification society. We want the "silver bullet" magic pill cure to things and that is basically what gun control proposals usually boil down to. We want to make the problem of violence go away and we don't want to put out any effort or for it to cost us money, so, we focus on the object, demonizing it, blaming it, trying to keep it under lock and chain because it appears to be the easy, magic pill solution. This despite this approach's history of failure.

People do not want to entertain the real solution because it is difficult. It requires us to rethink, re-prioritize, and put forth effort.

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Dave H on 09/19/2013 at 6:03 PM

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