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Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

Little Trump!!!! Hit the nail on the head. You should hear his kid talk about being a self-made man while working for his daddy. Same out of touch buffoons as the Trumps.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by hippyhelper on 09/28/2016 at 5:21 PM

Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

Thank you, Susan Tomblin. You got right to the point.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by MarkM on 09/28/2016 at 4:21 PM

Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

Disclaimer:
I no longer live in Colorado Springs, but used to live on N. Nevada and I still care about the city deeply.

If I'm reading the LTTE from Mr. McKeown correctly, the city is considering ripping out the median and installing 2 more lanes for traffic, one of which might at some point be for light rail?
Speaking as someone who works in the urbanism field, this is a CRAZY idea. Bonkers. I'm not talking about adding light rail, I think that would provide a high ROI if it connected UCCS to downtown. If done right, it would significantly increase property values along the route and be more attractive to those who don't want to own an automobile or use it for every trip. Provided land use intensified around the rail, especially on the far north end of Nevada, the city would see a solid bump in tax revenue. I differ w/ Mr. McKeown on turing lower floors into offices, or adding apartments or "granny flats" in the rear of now single family homes. Apartments, businesses to serve new people, and more density are not bad things. Done the right way, this is the traditional, organic way a city grows. Land around big community investments should be able to support those investments in the form of higher tax receipts. It's a win-win for property owners and the community alike.
A much better solution to adding rail along Nevada would be repurposing one lane on each side for the rail. N. Nevada has 4 lanes of auto only traffic. It does not need 4. There's no way traffic volume is high enough for that (perhaps there are some delays at "rush hours" but does it make sense to design an entire system around a few peak hours?) Even if it was, traffic is not a zero-sum game. It expands or contracts more like a gas than a liquid or solid (see: Induced Demand.) If you build more lanes for automobiles, you get more automobiles. If you repurpose lanes, the traffic disperses into the grid or goes away, or people choose times other than the peak to travel. Demolishing that median for rail would be providing the "carrot" of quality mass transit w/o the "stick" of discouraging car use. Keeping Nevada in it's current configuration & repurposing a lane for rail would also be substantially cheaper than demolishing the median and adding rail b/c the city would have one less lane for automobiles to maintain. Asphalt IS EXPENSIVE!
That median is a HUGE amenity to the surrounding neighborhoods. It softens the streetscape. slows automobiles (and quiets traffic noise), takes in pollution, provides shade for people and habitat for animals, and is visually pleasant.
Ripping out that median is anti-city. It's prioritizing the swift movement of automobiles over everything else. One lane of auto traffic each way is plenty. Taking the median out will have cascading effects. The city will not see a return on the investment of rail. It will devalue surrounding land values leading to lower tax receipts. It will lose valuable green space. It'll be on the hook for not only the maintenance costs of 4 lanes of auto traffic, but also the costs to run a now less valuable rail line. It will make Nevada a louder, less pleasant, uglier place to be.
Cities around the world are at a crossroad. They can continue on an auto-centric approach to planning (a world-wide EXPERIMENT of unprecedented scale), one that goes against millennia of accumulated knowledge on how to build cities, one that devalues the land around it at the same time is costs us dearly to build and maintain, or we can return to the values that make cities work for people first, using infrastructure that's already in place instead of building more that we can afford to maintain.
The cities that return to a people first approach will win the 21st century. The core of Colorado Springs is well-positioned to do so, with it's connected grid, walkable/bikeable streets, pleasant architecture, and parks/amenities. Ripping out the median on Nevada would be moving in the wrong direction and would lead to stagnation or worse for the surrounding neighborhoods.

Posted by rt on 09/28/2016 at 4:02 PM

Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

The town already has a daily newspaper that 'edits' comments by dictating which story readers will be allowed to comment on. Not to be confused with 'censorship', of course.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Robert Gentry on 09/28/2016 at 1:05 PM

Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

Do you guys edit any submissions? O wad Judd wondrinn.

Posted by mediumlondon on 09/28/2016 at 12:12 PM

Re: “The battle for Nevada Ave., animal abuse, Clinton and Trump, and more

A solar powered light rail down the middle of Nevada ave. from UCCS to PPCC, going right through CC is perfect! I despise guys who buy a house in the neighborhood I grew up in, and start yappin about powerful friends...wretch! Go home jerk, the real one, way over there. Oh yeah, if you live by Safeway, you ain't OLD NORTH END...which is a new term anyway... Used to be UPTOWN! Before that it was little London. Whatever...you got skinned if you bought in after the nineties...lemme guess you came west in a Toyota in 2006...First National Bank Uptown was at Boulder and Tejon. Downtown was at Pikes Peak. The tejon trolley tracks are still in the asphalt connecting uptown and downtown.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by mediumlondon on 09/28/2016 at 12:06 PM

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