Deirdre deProspero 
Member since Oct 31, 2010

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A postpartum doula and lactavist for over a decade in the Pikes Peak region. A founding member of the Pikes Peak Regional Doula Association, and… More »

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    If the sight of dented boxes and damaged labels at Community Foods shocks you, remember: It's what's on the inside that counts. Community Foods sells slightly damaged organic and natural groceries, stuff that's not pretty enough to line the shelves at Whole Foods but is still perfectly edible and incredibly cheap. The charming little store smells of herbs and dried grains, and even if you can't find the product you're looking for, you're sure to find something: organic mung beans and orzo rosamarina for $1.50; natural pet food at 50 cents to 75 cents a can; organic cereals for $2. Just beware, weekend shoppers, the religious tribe that runs the place keeps Sabbath on Saturday. The store closes at 3 p.m. on Friday and doesn't reopen until Sunday morning.

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    Best Of 2015: Deli

    Wholesome flair and well-priced eats make it worth the walk to this locally owned deli, residing in the outer Colorado College solar system on North Tejon Street. Wooglin's offers homemade taste that comforts its fair share of homesick students, but also staff and faculty. It's also a great little lunch spot for the corporate set, with standouts such as $6.99 half-pound burgers with crisp, house-made chips; loaded cold sandwiches; daily quiches; and thick slices of creamy cheesecake. With all these goodies, the walk there and back really isn't such a bad idea. — Bridgett Harris

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    Best Of 2013: • Indy Pick: Chicken pot pie

    I didn't pick this just because of the heart-shaped cracker that comes on top of each pie. It helps, but this heaping dish hardly needs much décor — the crispy, flaky top covering creamy vegetables and healthy chunks of chicken are more than enough. According to the general manager, this house specialty is by far one of the restaurant's most popular items, and starts out as nothing more than a chicken dumpling soup blanketed with a puff pastry crust. And since it's a mere $8.95, you have cash left over to indulge in the joint's more adult namesake offerings. — Edie Adelstein

    Bites 2013: Carrot Cake

    Though it comes in the shape of a slice, this huge monolith of dessert has more layers than Shrek, feeds up to four people, and fits just fine in a completely empty, jumbo-sized freezer (because you're not eating this whole thing at once). It's a symphony of creamy frosting, soft layers of cake and all the caloric guilt you can muster. ($9.95)

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    Best Of 2013: Natural Foods Store

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    Best Of 2011: Pet Groomer

    You never realize that dogs have toes until one day you try and wash one and she hates it so much you can see those toes clenched to the edge of the bathtub, while your shirt hangs soaked and shredded, and the shower curtain lies in a puddle, ripped off its rings. Yeah, some dogs don't like baths. And no promise of liver brownies, mackerel ravioli or even a pig's ear will get that dog wet. It's sponge baths for some of us, but for the less hydrophobic, Wag N' Wash is the place to clean your pup and then indulge him or her with gourmet treats, accessories and specialty dog food. Started right here in the Springs in 1999, WNW has expanded to six locations around Colorado and in Arizona, cleaning and feeding our stinky, spoiled pups. — Edie Adelstein

    Insider Guide 2010

    Wash tubs? Check. Kibble? Check. Toys? Check. Two resident cats to keep an eye on the place and make sure you pick up cat food, too? Double check. Visit Wag N' Wash when your dog's dirty, hungry or antsy. Just keep in mind that he'll love you forever if you forego the wash and just lead him over to the in-house bakery for samples.

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    Best Of 2011: Pet Groomer

    You never realize that dogs have toes until one day you try and wash one and she hates it so much you can see those toes clenched to the edge of the bathtub, while your shirt hangs soaked and shredded, and the shower curtain lies in a puddle, ripped off its rings. Yeah, some dogs don't like baths. And no promise of liver brownies, mackerel ravioli or even a pig's ear will get that dog wet. It's sponge baths for some of us, but for the less hydrophobic, Wag N' Wash is the place to clean your pup and then indulge him or her with gourmet treats, accessories and specialty dog food. Started right here in the Springs in 1999, WNW has expanded to six locations around Colorado and in Arizona, cleaning and feeding our stinky, spoiled pups. — Edie Adelstein

    Insider Guide 2010

    Wash tubs? Check. Kibble? Check. Toys? Check. Two resident cats to keep an eye on the place and make sure you pick up cat food, too? Double check. Visit Wag N' Wash when your dog's dirty, hungry or antsy. Just keep in mind that he'll love you forever if you forego the wash and just lead him over to the in-house bakery for samples.

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    The Business of Art Center's performance space has been getting busy these days with big-name alt acts like Split Lip Rayfield, Pueblo's mighty Haunted Windchimes and a day-long Mardi Gras jamboree. Since this is Manitou, expect at least one barefoot white guy with dreads and one blissful woman twirling a hula hoop.

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    Camp Guide 2011

    Venetucci Farm Summer Programs

    Venetucci Farm offers two, week-long day programs for girls and boys entering grades 3 to 7, filled with farm experiences like collecting eggs, feeding chickens, grooming a horse, slopping pigs, exploring wetlands, planting seeds, watering and weeding, and maybe even harvesting tasty garden snacks. Children learn about both the domestic and wild animals that make Venetucci Farm their home.

    389-1251 ext. 112, ppcf.org/summerprogramsforkids

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    Native American (North and South) folk art and crafts characterize Velez's collection. The shop bursts with baskets, muertos figurines, neo-Aztec-style paintings and pottery. Every item comes from a specific artisan the gallery contracts, and often their stories are as interesting as the works they create.

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    Best Of 2013: Performing Arts Group/Program

    Since TheatreWorks sits on the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs campus, some people might think it primarily puts on student productions. Some people would be wrong; this is a professional, regional theatre company. "We hire from across the country, across the region and from right here in town," says executive director Drew Martorella. "It's a good combination of energy." Then they take that energy and put it in a black box theater, so the stage and audience can be arranged differently for each production. And those productions are plenty different themselves. For instance, while 2013 will go out with Death of a Salesman and It's a Wonderful Life (staged as a 1940s radio drama), 2014 will begin with The Weir, a modern Irish play. "We want our audience to have a unique adventure every time they come," says artistic director Murray Ross. — Kendall Kullman

 

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