Walli Carranza 
Member since Feb 18, 2011


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Re: “Wasted away

The problems with health care, including behavioral health care, at the CJC are much bigger that even the Indy's story could cover. Inmates/Detainees who are on suicide watch are made to stay on a cot for up to 23hours a day; a practice that only increases suicidal levels of anxiety and one which highly increases the risk of an inmate developing a deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. We don't treat dogs that way and these are men and women who need counseling, medication and an opportunity to rebuild a sense of hopefulness.

Many if not the majority of those incarcerated are on very powerful prescription psychotropic medications and on cardiac, endocrine and neurological medications for life-threatening conditions when they are arrested. Missing a single dose of these meds can cause a severe deterioration in health, missing a couple of doses can easily cause seizures, hypertension and even death. Yet those arrested are forbidden to bring their medications, even in properly labeled bottles or even with a written prescription by a licensed health care provider. Even if the famiy goes to a pharmacy,fills a new prescription and has it sent to the CJC it will be rejected and at least one family that tried to pay an off duty officer to tranport it to the CJC directly from the pharmacy was told the medication would be rejected. The CJC formulary includes very few of the later generation medications; especially in behavioral health and it can take weeks to get a physician to see an inmate and prescribe even for the older, cheaper, generic drugs.

Life matters, and those who believe that human life is sacred from conception to natural death must not tolerate a callous disrespect for human life practiced at the CJC. I dare think "Life is sacred unless in you are in jail" is not the message preached on the hundreds of pulpits in the Springs each week.

Life can not be neglected and human beings must not be treated as trash in our jails. Not on our watch. Not with our tax dollars. In the light of the recent litigation that will cost our city thousands in legal fees and much more in settlement or jury award it is time for the appointment of a commission charged with revamping comprehensive health care at the CJC and Metro Jail. Psychologists, family practice and ER physicians, nurses, pharmacists, former inmates who have been impacted by these policies, attorneys and the families of those who have died must work together to use these deaths as a springboard for rewriting the policies for healthcare where we choose to incarcerate our fellow citizens.

We can do much better; our city can be the safest place in the nation for those who are incarcerated. The CJC should even be a place people get a solid, concrete start towards living healthier lives.

Nothing can bring these men and the others who have died needlessly in the CJC from suicide and missed opportunities for medical care back to their families. But I would encourage anyone filing litigation to include a demand for the appointment of a commission and acceptance and implementation of their recommendations into any settlement they negotiate. Then, truly their loved one's lives will not have been lost in vain.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Walli Carranza on 02/18/2011 at 6:33 PM

Re: “Two headlines, one death

The problems with health care, including behavioral health care, at the CJC are much bigger that even the Indy's story could cover. Inmates/Detainees who are on suicide watch are made to stay on a cot for up to 23hours a day; a practice that only increases suicidal levels of anxiety and one which highly increases the risk of an inmate developing a deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. We don't treat dogs that way and these are men and women who need counseling, medication and an opportunity to rebuild a sense of hopefulness.

Many if not the majority of those incarcerated are on very powerful prescription psychotropic medications and on cardiac, endocrine and neurological medications for life-threatening conditions when they are arrested. Missing a single dose of these meds can cause a severe deterioration in health, missing a couple of doses can easily cause seizures, hypertension and even death. Yet those arrested are forbidden to bring their medications, even in properly labeled bottles or even with a written prescription by a licensed health care provider. Even if the famiy goes to a pharmacy,fills a new prescription and has it sent to the CJC it will be rejected and at least one family that tried to pay an off duty officer to tranport it to the CJC directly from the pharmacy was told the medication would be rejected. The CJC formulary includes very few of the later generation medications; especially in behavioral health and it can take weeks to get a physician to see an inmate and prescribe even for the older, cheaper, generic drugs.

Life matters, and those who believe that human life is sacred from conception to natural death must not tolerate a callous disrespect for human life practiced at the CJC. I dare think "Life is sacred unless in you are in jail" is not the message preached on the hundreds of pulpits in the Springs each week.

Life can not be neglected and human beings must not be treated as trash in our jails. Not on our watch. Not with our tax dollars. In the light of the recent litigation that will cost our city thousands in legal fees and much more in settlement or jury award it is time for the appointment of a commission charged with revamping comprehensive health care at the CJC and Metro Jail. Psychologists, family practice and ER physicians, nurses, pharmacists, former inmates who have been impacted by these policies, attorneys and the families of those who have died must work together to use these deaths as a springboard for rewriting the policies for healthcare where we choose to incarcerate our fellow citizens.

We can do much better; our city can be the safest place in the nation for those who are incarcerated. The CJC should even be a place people get a solid, concrete start towards living healthier lives.

Nothing can bring these men and the others who have died needlessly in the CJC from suicide and medical neglect back to their families. They will never have an opportunity to heal and rise again back to their roles as dads and husbands as they might have with proper medical care. But I would encourage anyone filing litigation to include a demand for the appointment of a commission and acceptance and implementation of their recommendations into any settlement they negotiate. Then, truly their loved one's lives will not have been lost in vain.

Posted by Walli Carranza on 02/18/2011 at 6:32 PM

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