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Cinema Komunisto, Operation Petticoat, Mystery Science Theater 3000: XXX 

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click to enlarge Mystery Science Theater 3000: XXX

Mystery Science Theater 3000: XXX (NR)

Shout! Factory

Don't let those three Xs fool you — this isn't a porn parody of the long-running, movie-mocking cult television show. It's actually Volume 30 in Shout! Factory's quest to make every episode available to the public. And 30 entries later, they aren't slowing down, in terms of quality and selection. Here we have Mike, Joel and the 'bots riffing mercilessly on such cheesy gems as The Black Scorpion (scientists work with the Mexican army to take down these giant stingered beasts!), The Projected Man (an electrified scientist seeks shocking vengeance!), It Lives by Night (honeymooners get bitten by rabid bats!), and one of my absolute personal faves, Outlaw of Gor (an S&M-fueled Conan the Barbarian rip-off!). Whether you're a longtime collector or a first-time viewer, you can't go wrong with these four additions to the sprawling catalogue of comedy that is MST3K. — Louis Fowler

click to enlarge Operation Petticoat

Operation Petticoat (NR)

Olive Films

One of comedy legend Blake Edwards' earliest theatrical works, 1959's Operation Petticoat still holds up for pure ribald laughs and charming comedic adventure featuring top-shelf performances from Cary Grant and Tony Curtis. When their broken-down behemoth of a sub is about to be docked for good, the duo devises a plan to beg, borrow and steal the precious material needed for repairs. However, after a surprise attack, the sub is forced into battle, dented and leaking and with a cadre of five sexy stranded nurses. To make a long story short, the vessel, through a series of mishaps, ends up painted pink, on the enemy radar of both America and Japan, and on the short list to be destroyed as soon as possible. Operation Petticoat is such a hilarious comedy that I'm surprised it isn't more revered today, especially coming from a genius like Edwards. Batten down the hatch and rediscover this lost laugher. — Louis Fowler

click to enlarge Cinema Komunisto

Cinema Komunisto (NR)

Music Box

Making its stateside debut on VOD, Serbian director Mila Turajli's stirring Cinema Komunisto examines the overlooked Golden Age of Yugoslavian film under the post-WWII communist regime of President Josep Broz Tito. Not unlike Joseph Goebbels or the Kim Jongs, Tito held the power of propaganda, particularly via the medium of film, in great esteem. But in this documentary, Turajli makes a tantalizingly complex case for the savvy cinephile's long game, distilling the rose-colored nostalgia held for Tito among his former insiders and Hollywood pals alike to its national essence and heralding the relative creative freedom the dictator encouraged within his talent pool. Although some elements of the film's historical cheerleading are bigger stretches than others, Turajli's dogged research lends credibility to her equally dogged commitment to starting a discussion on cinematic myth-making. — Justin Strout

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