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IQ: Ka-ching 

It's been a decade since Colorado voters approved legalized gambling in three mountain towns to reinvigorate their economies and to preserve their architectural integrity. Did we do the right thing?

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Glam Drink
Artist

Has 10 years worth of gambling in Colorado mountain towns built healthy communities? Money is good for any community, so I guess so. I think the quality of life has increased for all the people that work in those towns.

Do these towns look at all as they did during the mining heyday of the 1800s? They're probably less atrocious and less decadent. Back in the mining days, prostitution and that kind of thing was really popular.

Should we expand slots and card table gaming all over Colorado? It's fine where it is. It helped those little meager communities, but we don't need to have it everywhere.

When is the last time you gambled at Cripple Creek? I don't gamble. The odds are against me.

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Lily Heinrick
World Savings Bank

Has 10 years worth of gambling in Colorado built healthy communities? It can build better communities by adding jobs and some revenue for the state, but over time it can breed addiction and gambling problems.

Do these towns look at all as they did during the mining heyday of the 1800s? They still have some of the same buildings, but at the same time there are all the lights and gambling machines.

Should slots and card table gaming be expanded all over Colorado? I don't think that would be a very good idea. It's best to keep it in a centralized area like Blackhawk and Cripple Creek.

When is the last time you gambled at Cripple Creek? In May, I was driving my friend up to court, and we decided to stop for lunch and gambled -- just four dollars or so.

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Paul White
U.S.D.A. Farm Services Agency

Has 10 years worth of gambling in Colorado built healthy communities? In the way it was intended to do so, yes. It was meant to help drive tourist dollars and it's done that.

Do these towns look at all as they did during the mining heyday of the 1800s? No, they do not. There's a tendency of the gambling establishment to sort of change the whole texture of the town.

Should slots and card table gaming be expanded all over Colorado? That would be fine. It does generate some tax dollars. I realize there's a downside, as in the people who tend to gamble their paycheck away, but that is a personal responsibility issue.

When is the last time you gambled at Cripple Creek? I've never gambled in Cripple Creek myself. I'm from Cortez, Colorado, and I go down to the Indian reservation in Towaoc and take advantage of their casinos.

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