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click to enlarge Robert De Niro and Eddie Murphy ham it up in Showtime, opening this week.
  • Robert De Niro and Eddie Murphy ham it up in Showtime, opening this week.

40 Days and 40 Nights (R)
I admit it. I laughed at a bunch of the raunchy one-liners in this lightweight sex comedy. But then, in retrospect, I got really disgusted with myself. It was like eating one of those gigantic Nestle Crunch bars in a darkened theater and feeling sick afterward. How could I have enjoyed this film? Everyone in it is a self-centered, superficial prick. All the women are objectified. When the 40 days are up and Josh Hartnett and Shannyn Sossamon finally get it on -- did I mention that the film's central conceit is Josh's vow of celibacy for Lent? -- well, you just kind of feel sorry for her. Then you just want to go home and throw up. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

All About the Benjamins (R)
Ice Cube plays a bounty hunter hot on the trail of a bail jumper (Mike Epps). When the two end up in an abandoned warehouse, which turns out to be a drop-off point for a major diamond heist, the two decide to team up. -- not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Amlie (R)
Screen grabber Audrey Tautou plays the winsomely beautiful and impish Amlie who has an overwhelming urge to help mankind by bringing lonely people together and healing the wounds of those hurt in love. The film's many subplots are endearing but her cat-and-mouse game with her own love interest -- designed to show us the emotional toll of her damaged heart -- is ultimately annoying and overly diverting. Altogether, Amlie is a pleasant confection, stylishly filmed and nicely acted. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Kimball's Twin Peak Theater

*A Beautiful Mind (PG-13)
With this film, director Ron Howard honors the kind of intellect that has long fascinated him. Who else would see the sexiness and intrigue of a Princeton graduate student who scribbles mathematical equations on the leaded glass windows of his dorm room? Russell Crowe seems born to play the part of Nobel Prizewinning mathematician John Nash who is also schizophrenic. And the beautiful Jennifer Connelly gets her breakthrough role here as Alicia, the physics graduate student who will eventually become Nash's wife, more than holding her own against Crowe's formidable presence. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Black Hawk Down (R)
Unlike so many Vietnam films such as Apocalypse Now, Platoon, Full Metal Jacket and Dead Presidents, which all comment heavily upon the absurdity of America's foreign war in a moral vacuum, Black Hawk Down refuses to judge the validity of the 1993 Special Forces operation in Mogadishu, Somalia. Instead, it focuses entirely on the way the soldiers must behave under fire. Please note: If you do not wish to see, or revisit, the realities of war, I highly recommend you skip this film. -- Noel Black

Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

The Count of Monte Cristo (PG-13)
Aside from noting that I expected a great deal more from a film with both Guy Pearce (the man behind the brilliantly acted chronic-amnesia case in Memento) and James Caviezel (the introspective and nature-loving philosophical naf in Terence Mallick's war epic The Thin Red Line), I really don't have much to say about Kevin Reynolds' adaptation of Alexander Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo other than it's entertaining ... and you may want to wait for it to come out on video. -- Noel Black

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Dragonfly (PG-13)
Directed by the king of frothy schlock, Tom Shadyac (Patch Adams), Dragonfly shamefully exploits the notion of deliverance from a life of the mind to a life of the heart -- a serious topic that deserves serious attention and creative treatment, not this knock-'em-over-the-head approach. What's most mystifying and most worthy of reproach is Kevin Costner's wooden performance; he comes across as bored -- not exactly what we're looking for in a leading man. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Carmike 10, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Gosford Park (R)
A classic Dorothy Sayerstype murder mystery with a soupon of class and historical consciousness in the mix. Like most of Robert Altman's films, this is a star-studded, extremely effective cast playing well-drawn characters with intersecting agendas. The unfolding plot can be confusing, even toward the end, but no matter; you're in the hands of a master so just sit back and be entertained. It's a glorious, pitch-perfect British romp. -- Andrea Lucard

Tinseltown

*In the Bedroom (R)
In the Bedroom portrays parental grief and loss more effectively and more thoroughly than in any American film since The Sweet Hereafter. Nick Stahl is just the right mix of hormonal glee and youthful innocence as Frank; Marisa Tomei is tone perfect as Natalie, the working-class young mother trying to put a life together; William Mapother makes your skin crawl as Natalie's husband Richard, especially when he tries to be friendly or conciliatory. And the performances of Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek as Frank's adoring parents, Matt and Ruth Fowler, are triumphs of subtlety and depth. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Tinseltown

John Q (PG-13)
When a hospital won't perform a heart transplant on a young boy, his father, played by Denzel Washington, takes the hospital staff hostage. -- not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Lantana (R)
This Australian film directed by Ray Lawrence is not a thriller, in spite of its central mystery -- the discovery of the dead body of an unidentified woman. It's a psychological drama about adult relationships, loyalty, grief, infidelity, disillusionment, existential crisis and, of course, love. Lantana shows us people as they really live -- on the surface, going through the motions, their sorrow deeply buried. Eventually, as in the much longer and messier American film Magnolia, all of the characters lives intersect at the edges, and eventually we find out which woman ends up dead. All the while, we are treated to superb acting, intelligent dialogue, an intriguing plot, fetching camera work and subtle direction. Lantana refreshes the viewer with its emotional honesty and entertains with real visual flair. It's an accomplished adult film with people of substance at its core -- a rarity in current cinema. Highly recommended. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Kimball's Twin Peak Theater

*Lord of the Rings (PG-13)
Director Peter Jackson makes brilliant use of the camera to enhance the action, and the sets, costumes and digital animation speak for themselves magnificently in this triumphant film adaptation of the Tolkien classic. The acting suspends disbelief for all but a few moments. Let the fanatics hash out the discrepancies with the book in their chat rooms. Peter Jackson did it. And this film is cool. Very cool. -- Noel Black

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Queen of the Damned (R)
Don't kid yourself when you flush seven bucks on Queen of the Damned. You're there for one reason: to see the undead Aaliyah in full diva divinity portraying an unearthly presence who was obviously snatched away by the Gods when they got a load of her looking like Isis in that heavily bedazzled tiara and scanty little sports bra from the Xena set. The movie itself was duly shruggable. -- Noel Black

Carmike 10, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Return to Neverland (G)
Peter Pan returns to battle Captain Hook after he kidnaps the daughter of Wendy in this Disney sequel. -- not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

The Time Machine (PG-13)
See full review, opposite page.

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

We Were Soldiers (R)
The true story of 450 U.S. soldiers, early in the Vietnam War, who became surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese in the Ia Drang Valley, in what became the first major battle of the extended conflict. Starring Mel Gibson Sam Elliott, Clark Gregg, Greg Kinnear. -- not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

  • Our reviewers' recommendations for films showing on Colorado Springs area screens.

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