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Movie picks 

Films recommended by our reviewers are indicated by an *.

*The Adjustment Bureau (PG-13)

Director George Nolfi does a terrific job of explaining details that might seem like arbitrary plot devices, as well as giving an ordinary mortal a fair shot against what are clearly the equivalent of angels. He wraps the exposition in sharp dialogue and performances that give the pronouncements extra significance. — Scott Renshaw

Chapel Hills 15, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Battle: Los Angeles (PG-13)

What were once just sightings will become a terrifying reality when Earth is attacked by unknown forces. — Not reviewed

Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son (PG-13)

Big Momma is back and this time he has big backup: his teenage stepson Trent. — Not reviewed

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Black Swan (R)

Director Darren Aronofsky has a knack for luring brittle, ropy women into masochistic lesbian-tending situations and for ending movies with a possibly fatal final leap. Could we forget about passion and maybe see some control? — Jonathan Kiefer

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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (PG)

It doesn't help, that the adventures here have no heft or emotion, and that the only truly involving characters are the talking warrior mouse and a dragon who enters the story literally out of nowhere. — MaryAnn Johanson

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Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules (PG)

As he begins seventh grade, Greg and his older brother Rodrick must deal with their parents' misguided attempts to have them bond. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*The Green Hornet (PG-13)

If the action is out-clevered by the comedy, it's a small price to pay, for the currency of slam-bang movie enjoyment and for some satisfying superhero yuks. — MaryAnn Johanson

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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (PG-13)

This Potter falls somewhere between ambitious and momentous in its own way, yet never quite as powerful as it wants to be. — Scott Renshaw

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Hall Pass (R)

When two men begin to show signs of restlessness at home, their wives take a bold approach to revitalizing their marriages: granting them one week of freedom to do whatever they want. — Not reviewed

Tinseltown

Hop (PG)

A comedy about E.B., the teenage son of the Easter Bunny. On the eve of taking over the family business, E.B. leaves for Hollywood in pursuit of his dream of becoming a drummer. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Insidious (PG-13)

When tragedy strikes their young son, Josh and Renai begin to experience things that science cannot explain. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*Jane Eyre (PG-13)

Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel has been adapted into some form of motion picture at least once every decade since 1914. By being greater than the sum of its parts, this Jane Eyre should stay fresh — at least until the next one. — Jonathan Kiefer

Kimball's Peak Three

Just Go With It (PG-13)

Adam Sandler is a plastic surgeon who creates a lie of being previously married to win a girl's affections. — Not reviewed

Tinseltown

*The King's Speech (PG-13)

Viewers expecting the stiff royal drama that the dull title implies will be just as surprised as the stuttering king when he's eventually able to deliver a flawless speech. — Tricia Olszewski

Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Kimball's Peak Three, Tinseltown

Limitless (PG-13)

Aspiring author Eddie Morra suffers from chronic writer's block, but his life changes instantly when an old friend introduces him to NZT, a new pharmaceutical that allows him to tap his full potential. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*The Lincoln Lawyer (R)

The Lincoln Lawyer features a completely different Matthew McConaughey. He's gaunt, mature and compelling in this enthralling, gritty crime drama from young director Brad Furman. — Justin Strout

Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Little Fockers (PG-13)

It's mystifying trying to fathom just what the hell an actor with the stature of Robert De Niro is doing in a movie that finds the height of its humor in a child's projectile vomiting and dick jokes. — MaryAnn Johanson

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Paul (R)

Like it was some sort of nerdnip, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost give us familiar one-liners to roll around in until we're too giddy to think straight. Past that, Paul doesn't offer much. — Scott Renshaw

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*Rango (PG)

Rango isn't just a great feature-length cartoon: it's effortlessly the best movie of 2011 so far, and it's the best Western in ages. — MaryAnn Johanson

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*Red Riding Hood (PG-13)

Despite a creaky start, Orphan screenwriter David Leslie Johnson works matinee magic, contorting the material into an easy bull's-eye for director Catherine Hardwicke to hit. — Justin Strout

Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Source Code (PG-13)

Where the whole endeavor could have been kinda sorta OK but not really all that great, it ends up being hugely distasteful, and idiotic for not even realizing it. — MaryAnn Johanson

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Sucker Punch (PG-13)

Those only interested in seeing attractive women in skimpy outfits kicking ass will find all they want in Sucker Punch. But those who want to see a movie that's actually good will instead leave just feeling like a sucker. — Dan Hudak

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*Tangled (PG)

Why is something with such familiar components so praiseworthy? Because it simply nails those components. The songs are Broadway-catchy, all three central voice performances are terrific and the comic relief proves genuinely amusing. — Scott Renshaw

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TRON: Legacy (PG-13)

Legacy lectures us about immersing ourselves in the digital world at the risk of our interactions in the real world, but we could have enjoyed its candy-coated delights without having to be warned that there's no place like home. — Scott Renshaw

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*True Grit (PG-13)

It may seem the Coen brothers just wanted to add "vintage Western" to the list of genre roads they've traveled. Instead, they have subtly crafted what may be their most deeply felt movie yet. — Scott Renshaw

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Unknown (PG-13)

Dr. Martin Harris awakens after a serious autombile accident in Berlin to discover that his wife suddenly doesn't recognize him and, meanwhile, another man has assumed his identity. — Not reviewed

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Yogi Bear (PG)

Yogi must prove that he really is "smarter than the average bear" and find a way to save Jellystone Park from closing forever. — Not reviewed

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  • Our reviewers' recommendations for films playing around the area.

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