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So near, so far Technology has improved 

So near, so far Technology has improved the speed, ease and frequency of communication. But some complain it's made human interaction increasingly impersonal, and that greater convenience is offset by escalating complexity and stress. With its current exhibits, the Sangre de Cristo Arts & Conference Center in Pueblo is taking visitors back to the Machine Age; see this week's cover story on page 14 for more.
click to enlarge Jim Manuel Loveland Retired college instructor - and - government administratorAre we too - dependent on technology? We're severely - dependent on it, but I don't know that we have a choice. - We'd be in big trouble with"a significant disruption in - electricity. -  - Would our economy be better off were it still - manufacturing-based? We'd be less dependent on - other countries, and there'd be better jobs for people - with middle and lower skill levels. It wouldn't be better - for higher-educated people. -  - Has e-mail made your interactions with others more - personal or less? Less. When I was teaching, I - wouldn't use e-mail because I wanted to hear the voices - of the students, so I could pick up on feelings and have - better discussions. -  - Would you prefer the quality of life as it was in the - 19th century, or as it is now? Probably now. In the - 19th century, unless you were relatively well off, life was - difficult. My grandfather, who was born in 1880, was a - miner in Central City, and he died by the time he was 40, - and that wasn't unusual.
  • Jim Manuel Loveland

    Retired college instructor and government administrator

    Are we too dependent on technology? We're severely dependent on it, but I don't know that we have a choice. We'd be in big trouble with"a significant disruption in electricity.

    Would our economy be better off were it still manufacturing-based? We'd be less dependent on other countries, and there'd be better jobs for people with middle and lower skill levels. It wouldn't be better for higher-educated people.

    Has e-mail made your interactions with others more personal or less? Less. When I was teaching, I wouldn't use e-mail because I wanted to hear the voices of the students, so I could pick up on feelings and have better discussions.

    Would you prefer the quality of life as it was in the 19th century, or as it is now? Probably now. In the 19th century, unless you were relatively well off, life was difficult. My grandfather, who was born in 1880, was a miner in Central City, and he died by the time he was 40, and that wasn't unusual.

click to enlarge Ben Taylor Downtown Museum shop - manager  - Are we overly dependent on technology? Think - of how many hours we dedicate each day to television, to - driving, to using cell phones. It's an age of technology- - fueled laziness. -  - Would your life change without e-mail or a cell - phone? I rely on them for communication. I'd feel - sealed off without them. -  - Is our economy better off being manufacturing- - based or technology-based? You're going to have - problems regardless. It's just a different set of problems - either way. -  - Have e-mail and cell phones made interaction more - or less personal? More personal. It allows you to - talk to people you wouldn't otherwise. -  - Was quality of life better in the 19th century, with - less pervasive technology? I'd have to say it's better - now, especially in areas like health care.
  • Ben Taylor

    Downtown

    Museum shop manager

    Are we overly dependent on technology? Think of how many hours we dedicate each day to television, to driving, to using cell phones. It's an age of technology- fueled laziness.

    Would your life change without e-mail or a cell phone? I rely on them for communication. I'd feel sealed off without them.

    Is our economy better off being manufacturing- based or technology-based? You're going to have problems regardless. It's just a different set of problems either way.

    Have e-mail and cell phones made interaction more or less personal? More personal. It allows you to talk to people you wouldn't otherwise.

    Was quality of life better in the 19th century, with less pervasive technology? I'd have to say it's better now, especially in areas like health care.

click to enlarge Jeremy Jones DowntownMagazine editor -   - Are we addicted to technology? Society would - shut down pretty quick without it. Technology has - become as much an infrastructure as roads and sewage - lines. -  - How would life change without e-mail and cell - phones? We're absolutely dependent on immediate - and constant communication. -  - Has e-mail served more to personalize or - impersonalize interaction with others? More - personal, because more continuous. -  - Pre-high-tech, was quality of life better? I'd - have to say yes, because of the greater simplicity. - Technology brings benefits, but it also brings stress and - increases the pace of life exponentially.
  • Jeremy Jones

    Downtown

    Magazine editor

    Are we addicted to technology? Society would shut down pretty quick without it. Technology has become as much an infrastructure as roads and sewage lines.

    How would life change without e-mail and cell phones? We're absolutely dependent on immediate and constant communication.

    Has e-mail served more to personalize or impersonalize interaction with others? More personal, because more continuous.

    Pre-high-tech, was quality of life better? I'd have to say yes, because of the greater simplicity. Technology brings benefits, but it also brings stress and increases the pace of life exponentially.

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