Favorite

Sound Advice 

click to enlarge Tom Waits  -  - Real Gone  - Epitaph	 This is what I love about Tom Waits: - The man can write the saddest, poignant love songs but - still scare the bejesus out of me with his audible - experiments and Big Bad Wolf voice. Real Gone - is Waits' strongest release in a few years, closely related - to 1992's Bone Machine in theme and in its mix - of rock and blues-rattle. "Top of the Hill" opens the - album, a blistering, thumping display of how ridiculously - versatile Waits is. A turntable scratches and samples, a - guitar explores with a looping light blues sound, and - damn if it isn't danceable. The mood carries on with - "Hoist That Rag," showcasing Waits' rumbling growl (and - Primus frontman bassist Les Claypool, who appears on - most tracks). "How's It Gonna End" invokes French cafes, - while relaying the tale of a litany of losers. Lyrically, it's - familiar territory: a fascinatingly dirty landscape of old - leather boots and rusty nails that fans will recognize as - typical Waits noir.    <
  • Tom Waits

    Real Gone
    Epitaph

    This is what I love about Tom Waits: The man can write the saddest, poignant love songs but still scare the bejesus out of me with his audible experiments and Big Bad Wolf voice. Real Gone is Waits' strongest release in a few years, closely related to 1992's Bone Machine in theme and in its mix of rock and blues-rattle. "Top of the Hill" opens the album, a blistering, thumping display of how ridiculously versatile Waits is. A turntable scratches and samples, a guitar explores with a looping light blues sound, and damn if it isn't danceable. The mood carries on with "Hoist That Rag," showcasing Waits' rumbling growl (and Primus frontman bassist Les Claypool, who appears on most tracks). "How's It Gonna End" invokes French cafes, while relaying the tale of a litany of losers. Lyrically, it's familiar territory: a fascinatingly dirty landscape of old leather boots and rusty nails that fans will recognize as typical Waits noir.

    <

click to enlarge p>Patton Oswalt  - Feelin' Kinda Patton  - United Musicians No, this isn't music, but it is - in CD form, and it is essential. Patton Oswalt, a stand-up - comedian who has been showcased on Comedy Central's - specials and Reno 911!, is a gnomish fellow - with a lot to say. Recorded live, Feelin' Kinda Patton - never fails to miss its mark. Like David Cross and - Dave Attell, the man's comedy is often amazingly smart - and approachable. Enjoy as he relates how '80s metal - bands' videos showed how hard they rocked by actually - altering the physical properties of things, like blowing - holes through walls and changing your Honda into a - Lamborghini ("Thanks, Night Ranger!"). Other highlights - include tales of his new TiVo trying to divine what shows - he likes, how demonic Alvin and the Chipmunk's - Christmas record is on slow play, and the many magical - uses for midgets. Oh my yes, Oswalt's humor is often - harsh and un-PC (c'mon, it's just plain wrong), - but I haven't laughed this hard in a long time.
  • p>Patton Oswalt

    Feelin' Kinda Patton
    United Musicians

    No, this isn't music, but it is in CD form, and it is essential. Patton Oswalt, a stand-up comedian who has been showcased on Comedy Central's specials and Reno 911!, is a gnomish fellow with a lot to say. Recorded live, Feelin' Kinda Patton never fails to miss its mark. Like David Cross and Dave Attell, the man's comedy is often amazingly smart and approachable. Enjoy as he relates how '80s metal bands' videos showed how hard they rocked by actually altering the physical properties of things, like blowing holes through walls and changing your Honda into a Lamborghini ("Thanks, Night Ranger!"). Other highlights include tales of his new TiVo trying to divine what shows he likes, how demonic Alvin and the Chipmunk's Christmas record is on slow play, and the many magical uses for midgets. Oh my yes, Oswalt's humor is often harsh and un-PC (c'mon, it's just plain wrong), but I haven't laughed this hard in a long time.

click to enlarge Saul Williams  -  - Saul Williams   - Faderlabel When does poetry become hip-hop? - Is it simply a matter of applying a catchy hook or a - thudding beat? Saul Williams is a master of both schools, - an MC who has produced a book of poetry, but has - always been above any arty pretension. His self-titled - album Saul Williams blurs the lines between - spoken-word performance and hip-hop, producing a set - where one bleeds seamlessly into the other. The quiet - "Talk to Strangers" introduces the recurring mood for the - album, urgent messages for desperate times. Rock - guitars rip into "Telegraph," playing hip-hop fantasy - against the true ghetto reality. With a nod to rap's - origins, he instructs, "Please see that mixer and - turntables are returned to Kool Herc." While "African - Student Movement" slides with a deep, sexy rumble, - "Grippo" has an outrageously infectious dance beat with - a looping dub hook. Here, Williams raps with a vocal - quality that nears punk rock aesthetics: "I gave hip-hop - to white boys when nobody was looking. They found it - locked in a basement when they gentrified Brooklyn." -
  • Saul Williams

    Saul Williams
    Faderlabel

    When does poetry become hip-hop? Is it simply a matter of applying a catchy hook or a thudding beat? Saul Williams is a master of both schools, an MC who has produced a book of poetry, but has always been above any arty pretension. His self-titled album Saul Williams blurs the lines between spoken-word performance and hip-hop, producing a set where one bleeds seamlessly into the other. The quiet "Talk to Strangers" introduces the recurring mood for the album, urgent messages for desperate times. Rock guitars rip into "Telegraph," playing hip-hop fantasy against the true ghetto reality. With a nod to rap's origins, he instructs, "Please see that mixer and turntables are returned to Kool Herc." While "African Student Movement" slides with a deep, sexy rumble, "Grippo" has an outrageously infectious dance beat with a looping dub hook. Here, Williams raps with a vocal quality that nears punk rock aesthetics: "I gave hip-hop to white boys when nobody was looking. They found it locked in a basement when they gentrified Brooklyn."

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Latest in Sound Advice

More by Kara Luger

  • Sixty Seconds

    ... with Busdriver, hip-hop artist
    • Oct 25, 2007
  • Boy, don't cry sellout

    Aesop Rock's latest CD may be on the lighter side but the emcee himself is still pretty dark
    • Oct 11, 2007
  • Learning from the past

    Rasputina's cello-rific rock takes a new turn by focusing on the current
    • Jul 5, 2007
  • More »

Top Viewed Stories

All content © Copyright 2015, The Colorado Springs Independent   |   Website powered by Foundation