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Three CD reviews

click to enlarge Sons and Daughters  -  - Love the Cup  - Domino Remember: if it's not Scottish, it's - crap! As bands like Franz Ferdinand are ruling supreme, - there seems to be a wee Scottish invasion coming our - way. Enter the Glasgow quartet Sons and Daughters: the - kids are all right, and know exactly what they're doing on - their seven-song EP, Love the Cup. In an - unlikely marriage that absolutely works; the album taps - the best of simple, White Stripes blues-rock and Celtic - folk. Adele Bethel and Scott Paterson share vocal duties, - alluringly overlapping each other on the opening track - "Fight." Another winner is "Johnny Cash," featuring a - driving, clunky guitar riff that has an authentic stomp to - it. Bethel's lyrics and vocals are reminiscent of Dry-era PJ Harvey, exuding a sexiness that's sort of - breathy but downright loud when she needs to be. The - result is good pub rock that's capable of being brooding - without inciting one to cry into his or her Guinness. - -- Kara Luger
  • Sons and Daughters

    Love the Cup
    Domino

    Remember: if it's not Scottish, it's crap! As bands like Franz Ferdinand are ruling supreme, there seems to be a wee Scottish invasion coming our way. Enter the Glasgow quartet Sons and Daughters: the kids are all right, and know exactly what they're doing on their seven-song EP, Love the Cup. In an unlikely marriage that absolutely works; the album taps the best of simple, White Stripes blues-rock and Celtic folk. Adele Bethel and Scott Paterson share vocal duties, alluringly overlapping each other on the opening track "Fight." Another winner is "Johnny Cash," featuring a driving, clunky guitar riff that has an authentic stomp to it. Bethel's lyrics and vocals are reminiscent of Dry-era PJ Harvey, exuding a sexiness that's sort of breathy but downright loud when she needs to be. The result is good pub rock that's capable of being brooding without inciting one to cry into his or her Guinness. -- Kara Luger

click to enlarge The Czars   -  - Goodbye  - Bella Union The Czars sound like they're big- - time, touring the world and marrying movie stars that - bear children named Apple. They haven't gotten huge - yet, though, which is odd. Goodbye is the third - album by this Denver quintet, following the well- - received The Ugly People vs. The Beautiful People. It opens with a gorgeously weepy piano solo, sliding - seamlessly into "Goodbye," a sparsely rendered song - reminiscent of Coldplay or Beck's boo-hoo masterpiece - Sea Change. Singer John Grant's vocals are a bit - dreary and often are left standing alone in the musical - landscape. His singing is lazily depressed, as if he - couldn't get off the couch if he tried. The lush "Hymn" - opens with just that, church-expanding harmonies - performed a capella, whereas " I Am the Man" launches - inexplicably into electro-rock, getting 1980s dark  la - New Order. In a particularly indulgent moment, Grant - moans, "But I was a blind man in love with a demon and I - couldn't figure it out." Yeowlicious. -- Kara - Luger
  • The Czars

    Goodbye
    Bella Union

    The Czars sound like they're big- time, touring the world and marrying movie stars that bear children named Apple. They haven't gotten huge yet, though, which is odd. Goodbye is the third album by this Denver quintet, following the well- received The Ugly People vs. The Beautiful People. It opens with a gorgeously weepy piano solo, sliding seamlessly into "Goodbye," a sparsely rendered song reminiscent of Coldplay or Beck's boo-hoo masterpiece Sea Change. Singer John Grant's vocals are a bit dreary and often are left standing alone in the musical landscape. His singing is lazily depressed, as if he couldn't get off the couch if he tried. The lush "Hymn" opens with just that, church-expanding harmonies performed a capella, whereas " I Am the Man" launches inexplicably into electro-rock, getting 1980s dark la New Order. In a particularly indulgent moment, Grant moans, "But I was a blind man in love with a demon and I couldn't figure it out." Yeowlicious. -- Kara Luger

click to enlarge Black Pegasus  -  - Knuckle Up  - Brass Knuckle Entertainment Colorado Springs' - hip-hop scene goes through phases where it's blazin' - and then a few months later, it's stagnant and stale. - Black Pegasus keeps heads bobbin' with his swagger- - inspiring rhymes and wordplay that have made him - quasi-famous. His new album, Knuckle Up, - offers beats with complexity and depth and huge - helpings of his witty rhymes. He isn't afraid of lyrically - pissing on radio stations that don't play his songs in - "Club Killah," and he does it with murderous technique. - He can also rock the radio-worthy "Ladies Say (LaLa)." If - there's a rapper in Colorado who has potential to make it - to the majors, it's Black P. He's got the looks and the - rhymes, and he's opened for Snoop, Jay-Z and 50 Cent. - Knuckle Up is good, and if he keeps - progressing, Black P's next album will be hot like what - Snoop's been droppin'. -- Sara Gallagher
  • Black Pegasus

    Knuckle Up
    Brass Knuckle Entertainment

    Colorado Springs' hip-hop scene goes through phases where it's blazin' and then a few months later, it's stagnant and stale. Black Pegasus keeps heads bobbin' with his swagger- inspiring rhymes and wordplay that have made him quasi-famous. His new album, Knuckle Up, offers beats with complexity and depth and huge helpings of his witty rhymes. He isn't afraid of lyrically pissing on radio stations that don't play his songs in "Club Killah," and he does it with murderous technique. He can also rock the radio-worthy "Ladies Say (LaLa)." If there's a rapper in Colorado who has potential to make it to the majors, it's Black P. He's got the looks and the rhymes, and he's opened for Snoop, Jay-Z and 50 Cent. Knuckle Up is good, and if he keeps progressing, Black P's next album will be hot like what Snoop's been droppin'. -- Sara Gallagher

  • Three CD reviews

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