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An abundance of edibles at Harvest Market

I was on my way out when I heard a guy ask the cashier if they took personal checks. "I just came in for a sandwich but I see so much other stuff!" he explained.

I had been surprised, too. Harvest Market, a little deli that was always a pleasure to visit, is breaking out of its mold. And breaking through walls.

Its old neighbor was Cascabel's Mexican restaurant; on Cascabel's other side was Boomzaaijer's Bakery, source of all things sweet and wonderful. Harvest Market has expanded into the space left vacant in Cascabel's departure and opened the wall to the Bakery. By the time you read this, Pikes Perk will have set up a small kiosk in the new common area. The space and all it offers will take a foodie's breath away.

The deli is as tempting as always. Available hot and cold sandwiches range from a Greek Gyro to a Reuben, from a terrific Veggie featuring avocado, caramelized onion and roasted peppers to a traditional meatball sub. Salads, quiche and pizzas are always on hand, the latter a filling bargain by the slice or whole pie. Not many pizzas around town can be topped with chicken, artichokes, shrimp or zucchini; your pizza at Harvest can be, in case the standard pepperoni and mushrooms seems humdrum. One of Harvest's calzones (the Veggie, filled with spinach, peppers, onions, mushrooms, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese, cheese, cheese, is the best) or Strombolis will fill you up for the entire day.

But Harvest is now much more than its deli. The soup case alone offers more variety than Campbell's ever considered, all frozen and waiting to be part of your emergency winter provisions. Imagine heading home on a cold dark night to a steamy bowl of Brazilian shrimp soup, redolent with lime, coconut milk, tomatoes, peanuts and ginger. Try the Lobster Bisque or the Clam Chowder, made authentically with broth rather than gallons of heavy cream. For that cream fix, you'll have to sample the Cream of Broccoli soup, the Creamy Cauliflower or the Cream of Asparagus delicately flavored with Mandarin oranges.

Heartier take-homes include Mediterranean Mussel Stew, a spicy Moroccan Lamb Stew and, soon, an assortment of pasta dishes from the late, sorely missed Pasta di Solazzi. Feel like cooking (sort of) rather than take-out? Dress up some fresh tamales (made at the Tamale Connection in Pueblo) with some salsa; accompany them with Harvest-made guacamole and chips. Get a container of Harvest's own Bolognese sauce and some fresh pasta. Start your own dishes with their already-prepped meats like steak coated in a paprika-cumin dry rub, chicken or beef kabobs, or Oriental marinated chicken. All the meats are organic, the chicken is from Red Bird, and all are either priced competitively or below prices seen at some of the larger supermarket chains.

The additional space means Harvest can now stock 10 times the range and variety of food it had before. Fresh fruit and specialty cheeses line two sections. In a central produce display, heirloom potatoes snuggle up to onions and other vegetables. Shelves are arrayed with all sorts of goodies; one shelf alone offers a variety of olive oils, and walnut, Hazelnut and grapeseed oils. There are condiments and spices found in only a few comparable specialty markets. Vanilla, for example, is available as extract, whole bean, powder or bean paste (used in place of whole bean in brles and ice cream). Mustards, salsa, marmalades, jellies and jams plaintively call from their shelves to the crackers, chips and breadsticks scattered in other displays. (I bought what I could, to unite them at long last ...)

With the Market's physical expansion complete, owner Derek Wall is now looking to expand the catering branch of the business -- a less daunting task after providing close to 50,000 meals to the Hayman fire workers last summer. Drop in to get a sense of what they can offer for your holiday table.

This little corner of Centennial is now a full-service spot. Start the day with a stop for coffee and some breakfast sweets in Boomzaaijer's Bakery. Come back to Harvest for a hefty lunch -- sandwiches made with deli meats from Boar's Head, freshly baked bread from the Bakery -- then return for provisions for home. Just don't forget your checkbook.

I was on my way out when I heard a guy ask the cashier if they took personal checks. "I just came in for a sandwich but I see so much other stuff!" he explained.

I had been surprised, too. Harvest Market, a little deli that was always a pleasure to visit, is breaking out of its mold. And breaking through walls.

Its old neighbor was Cascabel's Mexican restaurant; on Cascabel's other side was Boomzaaijer's Bakery, source of all things sweet and wonderful. Harvest Market has expanded into the space left vacant in Cascabel's departure and opened the wall to the Bakery. By the time you read this, Pikes Perk will have set up a small kiosk in the new common area. The space and all it offers will take a foodie's breath away.

The deli is as tempting as always. Available hot and cold sandwiches range from a Greek Gyro to a Reuben, from a terrific Veggie featuring avocado, caramelized onion and roasted peppers to a traditional meatball sub. Salads, quiche and pizzas are always on hand, the latter a filling bargain by the slice or whole pie. Not many pizzas around town can be topped with chicken, artichokes, shrimp or zucchini; your pizza at Harvest can be, in case the standard pepperoni and mushrooms seems humdrum. One of Harvest's calzones (the Veggie, filled with spinach, peppers, onions, mushrooms, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese, cheese, cheese, is the best) or Strombolis will fill you up for the entire day.

But Harvest is now much more than its deli. The soup case alone offers more variety than Campbell's ever considered, all frozen and waiting to be part of your emergency winter provisions. Imagine heading home on a cold dark night to a steamy bowl of Brazilian shrimp soup, redolent with lime, coconut milk, tomatoes, peanuts and ginger. Try the Lobster Bisque or the Clam Chowder, made authentically with broth rather than gallons of heavy cream. For that cream fix, you'll have to sample the Cream of Broccoli soup, the Creamy Cauliflower or the Cream of Asparagus delicately flavored with Mandarin oranges.

Heartier take-homes include Mediterranean Mussel Stew, a spicy Moroccan Lamb Stew and, soon, an assortment of pasta dishes from the late, sorely missed Pasta di Solazzi. Feel like cooking (sort of) rather than take-out? Dress up some fresh tamales (made at the Tamale Connection in Pueblo) with some salsa; accompany them with Harvest-made guacamole and chips. Get a container of Harvest's own Bolognese sauce and some fresh pasta. Start your own dishes with their already-prepped meats like steak coated in a paprika-cumin dry rub, chicken or beef kabobs, or Oriental marinated chicken. All the meats are organic, the chicken is from Red Bird, and all are either priced competitively or below prices seen at some of the larger supermarket chains.

The additional space means Harvest can now stock 10 times the range and variety of food it had before. Fresh fruit and specialty cheeses line two sections. In a central produce display, heirloom potatoes snuggle up to onions and other vegetables. Shelves are arrayed with all sorts of goodies; one shelf alone offers a variety of olive oils, and walnut, Hazelnut and grapeseed oils. There are condiments and spices found in only a few comparable specialty markets. Vanilla, for example, is available as extract, whole bean, powder or bean paste (used in place of whole bean in brles and ice cream). Mustards, salsa, marmalades, jellies and jams plaintively call from their shelves to the crackers, chips and breadsticks scattered in other displays. (I bought what I could, to unite them at long last ...)

With the Market's physical expansion complete, owner Derek Wall is now looking to expand the catering branch of the business -- a less daunting task after providing close to 50,000 meals to the Hayman fire workers last summer. Drop in to get a sense of what they can offer for your holiday table.

This little corner of Centennial is now a full-service spot. Start the day with a stop for coffee and some breakfast sweets in Boomzaaijer's Bakery. Come back to Harvest for a hefty lunch -- sandwiches made with deli meats from Boar's Head, freshly baked bread from the Bakery -- then return for provisions for home. Just don't forget your checkbook.

  • An abundance of edibles at Harvest Market

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