Wednesday, October 31, 2018

The FAC has the perfect opportunity to take action, and find cause for laughter

Posted By on Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 9:28 AM

We Are For Freedoms and Church & State, We Are For Freedoms: Nov. 2, 1-7 p.m., free; - Church & State: Fridays-Sundays Nov. 2-25, $18-$20; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 
30 W. Dale St., csfineartscenter.org. - COURTESY FAC
  • Courtesy FAC
  • We Are For Freedoms and Church & State, We Are For Freedoms: Nov. 2, 1-7 p.m., free; Church & State: Fridays-Sundays Nov. 2-25, $18-$20; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 
30 W. Dale St., csfineartscenter.org.
In times of political stress (and I think we can all agree we’re pretty politically stressed right now), there are two things we can do: take action, and find cause for laughter. The Fine Arts Center plans to help you do both on Nov. 2, starting with We Are For Freedoms. Part of the national For Freedoms 50-state initiative, a platform for creative civic engagement, We Are For Freedoms encourages citizens of all political persuasions to collaborate on a community art installation. Participants will produce posters and lawn signs expressing what freedom means to them, while The Press at Colorado College will open itself to the public and print signs featuring the work of artist Nora Naranjo Morse. The signs will be displayed on the FAC’s lawn and within the museum itself so we can all take a look at what freedoms our neighbors value, and maybe find some commonality in those values. All this, just in time for opening night of the FAC’s November play: Church & State. Written in 2016 following a fraught few years of mass shootings, Church & State tackles the hot-button issues of partisan politics, religion and gun control. While undoubtedly working with serious subjects, the playwright Jason Odell Williams said: “[A] heavy drama about heavy topics doesn’t interest me. What interests me is a play that gets to the heart of the people around these issues. And when you write about people, you can’t help but let them be funny and sad and honest, heartbreaking and uplifting all at the same time.” The play follows fictional senator Charles Whitmore, who decides three days before his re-election that he’s going to start speaking his mind — whatever’s on his mind. Meant to be both funny and introspective, the play will hopefully encourage conversation around some of our most divisive issues, and might offer a nice release in the form of much-needed laughter.
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Friday, October 26, 2018

Brian Elyo reminds us to slow down and take in the moment

Posted By on Fri, Oct 26, 2018 at 1:00 AM

ArtPOP: Brian Elyo, Oct. 28, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Cottonwood Center for the Arts, 427 E. Colorado Ave., free, pikespeakartscouncil.org.
  • ArtPOP: Brian Elyo, Oct. 28, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Cottonwood Center for the Arts, 427 E. Colorado Ave., free, pikespeakartscouncil.org.
Our world moves at a breakneck pace these days (anyone else wondering where 2018 went?), and we could all do with a little advice from local performer and artist Brian Elyo, also known professionally as Mobdividual. “Slow down,” he says. “Live more slow. Listen. Meditate — not only after yoga, not only on the mountaintop; but while you wait. Be still. Find art. Observe poetry. Decide beauty. Open interpretation for yourself.” Following his own advice and taking time to really observe the world around him, Elyo has filmed a series of vignettes ranging in length from 15 seconds to several minutes. These films start off blurry, then bring their subject slowly into focus, exposing colors, tones and shapes that we as viewers may not have noticed were we to pass the scenes on the street. During Sunday’s event, he plans to project these vignettes on multiple walls, and play his unique ambient guitar to create a soundscape to accompany them. “The spirit is really to be overwhelmed with relaxation,” Elyo says. “... Hopefully later, upon reflection, folks start to slow themselves down. Take a little extra time to sit and be still in their day-to-day. Take a little extra time on the trail, sit a little longer in the yard or outside, pay attention to the shadows in the stairway, the reflections from whatever on your desk at work.” The immersive experience should prove meditative, and inspire viewers to take a little step back from the constant movement of everyday life.
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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Three Nights of Horror Film Festival gives you plenty of chances to scare yourself silly

Posted By on Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Three Nights of Horror Film Festival, Oct. 25, 6-10 p.m., Oct. 26, 6 p.m. to midnight, Oct. 27, 4-10 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, timgillcenter.org.
  • Three Nights of Horror Film Festival, Oct. 25, 6-10 p.m., Oct. 26, 6 p.m. to midnight, Oct. 27, 4-10 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, timgillcenter.org.
For some of us, Halloween starts the moment the leaves start turning, or the moment we check off Sept. 30 on the calendar (whichever comes first). But now it’s officially and unquestionably Halloween, or Halloween-enough to really get into the mood and scare yourself silly. To help you toward that end, the Independent Film Society of Southern Colorado is back with its annual horror film festival, screening eight films over three nights (plus some as-yet-unannounced indie horror shorts). Oct. 25 will be ‘80s night (Child’s Play, Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors), with zombie night on Oct. 26 (Army of Darkness, Zombieland, The Return of the Living Dead) and horror classics on Oct. 27 (Frankenstein, Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Screaming Skull). A special bonus on zombie night: Blissfest333, a Denver group named for its annual arts and culture festival, will host a Zombie Festival and Crawl right outside the Tim Gill Center. Before any screenings start, check out makeup demos and contests, and congregate with other horror enthusiasts for the zombie crawl at 7 p.m. All events are free. All IFSOC asks is that you drink up, as all proceeds from booze sales go directly back into their programming.
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Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Can't-miss events to celebrate the final week of Arts Month

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Each October, the Pikes Peak region celebrates Arts Month as a way to elevate the visibility and importance of arts & culture in our community. During Arts Month, you’re encouraged to have at least one new cultural experience with family or friends!

Though #ArtsOctober is coming to a close, there's still plenty to see and do!

Find more Arts Month details, including resources, event info, and more at PeakRadar.com/ArtsMonth!

'Colorado Experience: Fannie Mae Duncan' Screening
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October 23 at 6 p.m. | Stargazers Theatre & Event Center | Free, Registration Required
Join Rocky Mountain PBS for a preview screening of the hour-long documentary “Colorado Experience: Fanny Mae Duncan.” Meet the inspiring Fannie Mae Duncan, an African American nightclub owner who brought the motto “Everybody Welcome” to true meaning at her Colorado Springs Cotton Club despite the volatile Civil Rights Movement of her day.



Colony House

October 24 at 7 p.m. | The Black Sheep | Advanced Tickets: $10.39; Day of Show: $18
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Picture the quintessential rock band. Maybe they’re standing on a grimy street corner with their arms crossed, looking tough, or maybe they’re goofing around in a sunlit field. They could be wearing motorcycle jackets or cowboy shirts or feather boas. They might sound austere and angry or epic and stadium-ready. But what they have in common, regardless of aesthetic, is that they stand together, shoulder-to-shoulder, brothers and sisters in arms. A real rock band is a gang. A group of people united by a shared commitment to what matters in the world, what matters in life, and an insatiable need to communicate that sensibility to anyone else out there who might relate.

Emma Crawford Coffin Race & Parade
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October 27 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. | Manitou Springs | Free
Manitou Springs celebrates the 24th Annual Emma Crawford Coffin Races & Festival! The parade starts at 12 p.m. followed by up to 70 teams racing coffins down Manitou Avenue for the ultimate victory! Each team consists of one Emma and four runners dressed in costume. The fastest three timed places earn trophies as well as a chance at Best Entourage, Best Coffin, a 2018 Miss Emma will be crowned, and a new team destined to race for the Coffin Cup in Nederland at the 2019 Frozen Dead Guy Days – so come dressed to impress, and race your face off!

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Monster Mash
October 26 and 27 at 7:30 p.m. | Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts | Tickets start at $26
Join the Colorado Springs Philharmonic for Monster Mash, part of the Philharmonic Pops series. A spooktacular night of scary tricks and musical treats, performed by an orchestra possessed by thrilling classics and the newest movie thrillers. Costumes optional.





Three Nights of Horror Film Festival
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October 25 from 6-10 p.m.; October 26 from 6 p.m. to Midnight; October 27 from 4-10 p.m. | Tim Gill Center for Public Media | Free
Local filmmakers will be on site during the festival, which will feature local indie horror short films along with cult classic horror feature films. Films will be shown Thursday, Friday and Saturday night along with the Colorado Springs Zombie Crawl having their annual zombie crawl Friday night. Beer will be available from local breweries with all proceeds supporting the non-profit Independent Film Society of Colorado (IFSOC), helping to support and promote independent film in the Pikes Peak Region.

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'The Postman Always Rings Twice'
October 19-20 and 25-27 at 6:30 p.m.; October 20 and 27 at 2 p.m. | Fountain Community Theater | Tickets start at $9

"The Postman Always Rings Twice" is an adaptation by Jon Jory from the novel by James M Cain. Drifter Frank Chambers accepts a job from the alcoholic owner of a diner in a town he’s hitchhiking through. Frank and Cora – the diner owner’s young wife – quickly start a romance. Cora convinces Frank the only way they can be together is for Frank to kill husband Nick and collect the insurance money, but a botched first plan leaves Nick in hospital. Suspecting nothing about the affair, Nick resolves to sell the diner and take Cora away. Now desperate, Cora and Frank stage an automobile accident. This time Nick is killed. But the District Attorney is suspicious and pits the two of them against each other. And soon, their hopes of being together are shattered.
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Monday, October 22, 2018

Colorado Springs, A Changing Landscape presents iconic photos alongside PPCC student photographers

Posted By on Mon, Oct 22, 2018 at 8:50 AM

GLENN WESLEY MURRAY (TOP), SUSI HOLMES (BOTTOM)
  • Glenn Wesley Murray (top), Susi Holmes (bottom)
On Oct. 26, photographer Angela Crews, publisher Don Kallaus of Rhyolite Press, and eight Pikes Peak Community College photography students (current and alumni) will see a two-years-in-the-making vision realized.

Colorado Springs, A Changing Landscape, is a brand new exhibition that will present “then and now” photos of the Colorado Springs cityscape to provide “an important inspection of our city, the changes that come with modernization and time, as well as pause to consider what is important to us to move forward,” according to a press release.

The photography students (Joseph Baldwin, John Bawi, Margaret Beaty, Susi Holmes, Jim Mangette, Ken Slager, Jodie Westbrook Bomze and Jennifer Williams) set out to replicate the photographs of Glenn Wesley Murray, a prolific local photographer, active between the 1930s and mid-1960s. Shooting from the same locations as Murray, but many decades later, the photographers have captured the change and growth the city has undergone.

The photographs will also be released in a book during the opening reception at Centennial Hall (Oct. 26, 7 p.m.). The exhibition will be on display through Dec. 15.

The press release offers a small taste of what attendees can hope to expect:
Susi Holmes captured a night shot of Tejon Street from high atop the Hagerman building, eighty-seven years to the minute to mirror Murray’s historic view. Ken Slager and Joseph Baldwin will wow viewers with a night shot of Palmer High School that mirrors Murray’s efforts to capture General Palmer’s shadow sitting proudly upon his steed against the façade of the old, Colorado Springs High School. These two shots, among so many others, capture the essence of our beautiful city and the growth we have experienced in as many as nine decades.
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Friday, October 19, 2018

Aerial Aura is the perfect chance to experience a new kind of movement art

Posted By on Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Aerial Aura, Oct. 21, 2-3 p.m., Garden of the Gods Visitor & Nature Center, 1805 N. 30th St., free, pikespeakartscouncil.org. - KEN SLAGER
  • Ken Slager
  • Aerial Aura, Oct. 21, 2-3 p.m., Garden of the Gods Visitor & Nature Center, 1805 N. 30th St., free, pikespeakartscouncil.org.
Aerial arts consistently break the bounds of the stage, with performers climbing and whirling to new heights with their art through circus and cabaret. But a group of local aerialists plan to do away with the stage altogether at a special Arts Month performance in Garden of the Gods this weekend. Held outdoors with Pikes Peak as a backdrop, Aerial Aura will feature at least four performing artists, including Emily and Chris Wegert, Julia Angevine and Mallory Pedersen, performing a mix of trapeze, silks and hoop. The Wegerts, proud newlyweds, plan to perform a duo trapeze act. Other acts and apparatuses are dependent on the weather, but no matter what performance you see you’ll have a chance to experience a new kind of movement art, and ask the performers questions between their shows.
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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Matte Refic's The Shadows sheds light on dark emotions

Posted By on Thu, Oct 18, 2018 at 1:00 AM

The Shadows, Opening reception, Oct. 19, 5-7:30 p.m.; workshop with artists, Nov. 8, 4-5:30 p.m.; on display through Dec. 2., Downtown Studio Gallery at Pikes Peak Community 
College, 100 W. Pikes Peak Ave., ppcc.edu. - MATTE REFIC
  • Matte Refic
  • The Shadows, Opening reception, Oct. 19, 5-7:30 p.m.; workshop with artists, Nov. 8, 4-5:30 p.m.; on display through Dec. 2., Downtown Studio Gallery at Pikes Peak Community 
College, 100 W. Pikes Peak Ave., ppcc.edu.
Art offers a great avenue — sometimes the only avenue — through which we can address the feelings society tells us to be ashamed of. In The Shadows, Pueblo artist Matte Refic uses his art to explore “the discomfort and unwillingness we feel when confronting the darker emotions that can stigmatize our lives.” A mural artist by trade, Refic is part of the Pueblo-based graffiti art collective “The Creatures,” but he has prepared smaller-scale works for this exhibition. The Shadows also features work from the Combat Paper program. Combat Paper, which hosts annual workshops at PPCC, aims to turn military uniforms into paper to be used in artistic expression. “A uniform worn through military service carries with it stories and experiences that are deeply imbued in the woven threads,” the Combat Paper website reads. “Creating paper and artwork from these fibers carries these same qualities.” Meet Refic and Combat Paper artists Eli Wright, Kevin Basil and Nathen Lewis at Friday’s opening reception, and take some time to explore The Shadows. Only through addressing the stigma can we overcome it.
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Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Take a chance on Springs Ensemble Theatre's The Last Rabbit

Posted By on Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 11:10 AM

The Last Rabbit, Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 4 p.m., through Oct. 28. Springs Ensemble Theatre, 1903 E. Cache La Poudre St., $10-$15, springsensembletheatre.org. - EMORY JOHN COLLINSON
  • Emory John Collinson
  • The Last Rabbit, Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 4 p.m., through Oct. 28. Springs Ensemble Theatre, 1903 E. Cache La Poudre St., $10-$15, springsensembletheatre.org.
Though few turn to the theater for a fright during the Halloween season, I recommend taking a chance on The Last Rabbit, a world premiere by local playwright Jessica Weaver. Drawing on classic elements of the horror genre — an isolated area, a simple hick, a vulnerable woman — Weaver turns those elements on their heads to create a unique and deeply disturbing play.

The protagonist, a prostitute named Alice (Abby Gaydos), wakes up injured in a trailer home in the desert, where a stranger, Jim (Taylor Geiman), claims to have taken her to nurse her back to health. Echoing dialogue and a soundtrack of dissonant guitar immediately disorients the audience — our first clue that something’s not quite right about this situation.

If you think you can see where this is going based on the conventions of the genre, you’re mistaken. The first half-hour of the play, sure, you gather clues that you think might point to Jim’s nefarious purpose and spotty backstory. But — and I can’t emphasize this enough — this play gets weird.

I’m hesitant to spoil the surprise, the introduction of a third character (ingeniously played by three actors: Ellie Hinkle, David Brown and Brittany Nicole Merritt) that shifts the tone of the play. But you should know going in that the power dynamics between Jim and Alice aren’t what they seem.
The script, though longer than necessary in my estimation, does some of the work conveying that to the audience. But its clues would mean nothing without strong actors. Gaydos’ Alice is headstrong, but beaten down. She’s vulnerable, but never “fragile” as Jim claims. Knowing this as an audience member, as Jim fails to see it onstage, inspires a kind of anticipatory delight — you spend endless, tense minutes waiting for her hidden power to be unleashed.

Then Geiman — phew! On paper, the character might echo Norman Bates, as his obsession with his “mama” is familiarly off-putting. But Geiman plays Jim with an obvious innocence and a very quiet thread of lethality that lands very effective.

Director Bob Morsch intentionally ups the audience’s sense of claustrophobia, confusion and anxiety with stellar sound design, and blocking that keeps elements of the small set a mystery until the time comes to reveal them. Also, props to, well, props designer Jillmarie Peterson, who stocked the house with tiny, relevant details — even details we may not see.

The script does have its weak moments; characters sometimes lose their distinctive voice, and the opacity of the dialogue means we don’t always understand exactly what the characters are doing. Without Friday night’s talkback with the playwright (and a quick google of “the rabbit test”), I might have missed parts of the plot that wanted explanation. But whether or not you understand all of its details, it’s a perfect, unconventional, seasonal scare.
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Angela DelFini Explains It All for You at the MAT

Posted By on Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Angela DelFini Explains It All 
for You, Oct. 18-20, 7:30 p.m., Millibo Art Theatre, 1626 S. Tejon St., $18-$25, themat.org. - COURTESY EMILY OWENS PR
  • Courtesy Emily Owens PR
  • Angela DelFini Explains It All 
for You, Oct. 18-20, 7:30 p.m., Millibo Art Theatre, 1626 S. Tejon St., $18-$25, themat.org.
The Millibo Art Theatre has a long and successful history of opening their seasons with fascinating one-man shows, but this year represents a departure — in particular because Italian performer Angela DelFini calls Angela DelFini Explains It All for You a “3/4-woman show.” To be clear, she is the sole performer, playing two characters: a psychiatrist (named after herself) and her patient, Estrella. In an attempt to get Estrella to break out of her shell and “find her laughter,” DelFini takes her on a five-step recovery program using the power of circus, dance, clowning and, of course, audience participation (gulp). DelFini has studied under clowning masters from Italy to France to New York, so her pedigree promises entirely unique and insanely effective physical comedy. As an added bonus, DelFini and her co-writer John Townsen will be teaching a master class in physical comedy while they’re in town, perfect for clowns, actors, vaudeville performers and the like. Check out details on the Millibo website.
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Monday, October 15, 2018

Can't-miss events to celebrate the third week of Arts Month

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Arts Month is here! Each October, the Pikes Peak region celebrates Arts Month as a way to elevate the visibility and importance of arts & culture in our community.

During Arts Month, you’re encouraged to have at least one new cultural experience with family or friends! We'll highlight a few events each week in October that are fun, easy ways to get involved in #ArtsOctober.

Find more Arts Month details, including resources, event info, and more are at PeakRadar.com/ArtsMonth!

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company: A Letter to My Nephew
October 16 at 7 p.m. | Ent Center for the Arts | Tickets start at $27.50

A Letter to My Nephew is an intimate, impressionistic collage for nine dancers, setting a portrait of Jones’s beloved nephew Lance T. Briggs — a talented dancer who struggled with illness and addiction — against the political landscape of the present. This dramatic work is an evocative and moving composition of imagery, movement, and sound. Featuring Janet Wong’s haunting projections, composer Nick Hallett’s delirious score, and live performance by baritone Matthew Gamble and Hallett, Jones’ cultural critique is rewritten for the time and place of every performance, flashing by each night like a feverish hour of the evening news.
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Tejon Street Corner Thieves
October 17 at 5:30 p.m. | Corner of Pikes Peak and Tejon | Free

This acoustic music group has won several local awards and tours nationally. Well known for their great music, and over the top performances, a Tejon Street Corner Thieves show is like a breath of fresh mountain air. To quote their own biography, despite their name, the only thing they will steal is your heart.

ArtPOP is a series of 20 artist-driven pop-up performances, exhibitions and creative experiences in various locations across the region during the month of October.
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Alice in Chains
October 18 at 7:30 p.m. | Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts | $56 – $87

The walls of the Pikes Peak Center will reverberate with power chords when American hard rockers Alice in Chains make their Colorado Springs debut. One of the four ‘founding fathers’ of grunge in the U.S. Northwest, along with Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, Alice in Chains was one of the most successful music acts of the 1990s, selling more than 20 million records worldwide, with two No. 1 albums. While their counterparts expressed a more indie, punk and classic rock influence, Alice in Chains arrived on a metallic Black Sabbath-inspired bubble powered by charismatic singer Layne Stanley and guitarist/vocalist Jerry Cantrell.
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A Choral Confluence

October 20 at 3 p.m. | Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts | Free
A Choral Confluence will include performances by the Choralaborative member choirs as well as a grand performance by the 300+ voice collective. “If you have ever wondered what it sounds like when 300+ people come together as a single choir, this is your perfect opportunity to experience it live,” says Colorado Springs Children’s Chorale director, Marcia Hendricks. “With the beautiful acoustics of the Great Hall at the Pikes Peak Center, these choirs are poised to thrill and inspire attendees.”

The Choralaborative is a unique collaboration that brings together eleven local choral organizations including: Abendmusik, America the Beautiful Chorus, Out Loud Men’s Chorus, Vocal Fusion, Colorado Springs Children’s Chorale, Colorado Springs Choral Society, Colorado Vocal Arts Ensemble, Pikes Peak Threshold Singers, Celebration Multi Cultural Ensemble, Soli Deo Gloria Chorus, and the Velvet Hills Chorus.
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Creative Corridor Photo Scavenger Hunt
October 20 from 2-8 p.m. | Manitou Art Center | Free

Join the Colorado Photography Learning Group, the City of Colorado Springs, the Downtown Partnership of Colorado Springs and the City of Manitou Springs for a fun photo scavenger hunt through the Creative Corridor in celebration of Arts Month. Please note that this event requires a considerable amount of walking and is not suitable for young children or those who have difficulty being on their feet for several hours.
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Colorado Springs Mini Maker Faire
October 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. | PPLD - Library 21c | Free

In the four years of its existence, the Colorado Springs Mini Maker Faire has drawn over 20,000 attendees who enjoyed hands-on experiences with over 100 makers and artists. Highlights have included:
  • Rocket launches
  • Robots, including R2-D2
  • Skyping with a scientist in Antarctica
  • 3D printing
  • Food trucks
  • LEGOs
  • Jewelry makers
  • A tiny house and a school bus converted into a camper
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Gustav Mahler: Song Of The Earth
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October 20 at 7:30 p.m.; October 21 at 2:30 p.m. | Ent Center for the Arts | Tickets start at $26
Join the Colorado Springs Philharmonic for Gustav Mahler: Song Of The Earth, part of the Al and Leigh Buettner Signature Series.
  • Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano
  • John Matthew Myers, tenor
  • Joined by a select ensemble of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic
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Saturday, October 13, 2018

Sheriff of Nottingham: A Breezy Cornucopia of Lying and Bluffing

Posted By on Sat, Oct 13, 2018 at 11:59 PM

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The triumphal cackles are ear-splitting.

I didn’t think that my young opponent was sophisticated enough to run a reverse-psychology ploy on me, but he was. I looked into the bag he was carrying to market and it was clean as a whistle, the contents exactly as advertised. Which means I’m a pretty bumbling Sheriff right now and the Redfern boys (pictured above) are loudly savoring my ineptitude.

You’ll get your chance to be browbeaten, lied to, bluffed and embarrassed in Sheriff of Nottingham, too. Here’s the premise: Each player takes turn being the Sheriff while everybody else plays merchants who are bringing goods to market. Players can load up on innocuous items like loaves of bread and apples…and also black market items that are riskier, but score more than legal items.

There’s a beautiful sequence each turn where marketeers load cards up into a little pouch and announce that they’re ready. The paunchy Sheriff stops them on their way in, at which point they have to declare the exact contents of their bag.

Now, if you’re the Sheriff in this case, you have three options:

• Let them pass unchallenged.

• Demand to see the contents of their bag; if they have what they say they had, the Sheriff is penalized. If they fudged, they pay the price.

• You can do neither, instead leaning on them for bribes and favors. (“I’m pretty sure you’ve got some sanctioned goodies in that bag; how’s about you just slide me one and spare us all the unpleasantness of a search?”)

At the end of the game, everybody totals up the categories of goods they got safely to market and you have a winner. Sheriff of Nottingham runs on a light ruleset and puts the complexity and focus where it ought to be: Huffing and puffing your way through a thicket of bluffs, lies and outright bullying.

While market goods are the ostensible currency, the real juice is in the emotional rush of trying to put one over on your friends—or being crestfallen as a slick-tongued vendor puts one over on you. There is some strategy around how you manage your hand and what kind of goods you’re targeting for scores, but your poker face and nerves are your primary assets here.

Sheriff of Nottingham seats from three to five players and has a few advanced optional rules if you want an extra challenge, but we have yet to explore that far. The base rule set on its own has proven a kick in the pants and a perfect addition to our growing set of fast-moving social bluffing games.
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Thursday, October 11, 2018

Manitou Art Center is going all out for their milestone anniversary this year

Posted By on Thu, Oct 11, 2018 at 1:00 AM

MACnificent 2018, Oct. 13, 6-10 p.m., Manitou Art Center, 513 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs, 
manitouartcenter.org. - BROKEN GLASS PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Broken Glass Photography
  • MACnificent 2018, Oct. 13, 6-10 p.m., Manitou Art Center, 513 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs, 
manitouartcenter.org.
It’s impossible to imagine Manitou Springs without the Manitou Art Center, as this artistic hub has been a fixture in the little mountain town for 30 years now, displaying unique and powerful art exhibits, offering makerspaces and studio space, and providing a venue for countless cultural experiences. While the MAC’s annual fundraising gala, MACnificent, is always a spectacular celebration of the organization’s hard work, they’re going all out for their milestone anniversary this year. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres presented by Adam’s Mountain Café (another Manitou staple), live music by the Charlie Milo Trio, signature drinks, and fast-paced, creative presentations by area artists like mosaic-maker Juanita Canzoneri and photographer Mike Pach. The presentation format is called PechaKucha, which restricts presentations to 20 photos, each displayed for only 20 seconds as the artists speak. It should be a fun way to learn about what community creators are up to, while celebrating the MAC’s enduring relevance.
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Indie Author day is the perfect time to look at a changing landscape

Posted By on Thu, Oct 11, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Indie Author Day - Oct. 13, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive, free, facebook.com/PikesPeakLibraryDistrict. - COURTESY KATE JONUSKA
  • Courtesy Kate Jonuska
  • Indie Author DayOct. 13, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive, free, facebook.com/PikesPeakLibraryDistrict.
Here at the Indy, we appreciate things that are, well, indie. Independent creators, whether they be authors, artists, filmmakers or musicians, often work outside the margins and stick to their vision without restriction from a publisher — and without the benefits of a publisher’s resources. Indie Author Day, a national initiative, is meant to recognize the hard work of these creators (such as Kate Jonuska, whose novel Transference is pictured above). Our own local celebration should prove worthwhile for authors and readers alike. Hosted by Pikes Peak Library District in honor of Arts Month, Indie Author Day will include panels and demonstrations by all kinds of independent creators, discussing the changing landscape of the indie world. In a digital age, it is much easier to share the things we create, but how does that affect the indie industries that provide us with countless hours of entertainment and enrichment? This is a good chance to find out.
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Savage in Limbo at Brooklyn's is can't-miss entertainment

Posted By on Thu, Oct 11, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Savage in Limbo, Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays through Oct. 23, 7 p.m., Brooklyn’s on Boulder Street, 110 E. Boulder St., $30-$35, brooklynsonboulder.com. - COURTESY MAPLE & MOSS STAGING AND DESIGN
  • Courtesy Maple & Moss Staging and Design
  • Savage in Limbo, Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays through Oct. 23, 7 p.m., Brooklyn’s on Boulder Street, 110 E. Boulder St., $30-$35, brooklynsonboulder.com.
While it’s a local favorite place for cocktails, Lee Spirits’ speakeasy Brooklyn’s on Boulder Street isn’t what one might typically consider a “theater.” However, it should be an appropriate venue to stage the 1984 John Patrick Shanley play, Savage in Limbo, which takes place entirely in a seedy Bronx bar. This first-ever pop-up play in Brooklyn’s intimate setting meets four bar regulars, all of whom just so happen to be the same age, 32. With a few interconnected love triangles and a mix of “zany comedy” and “tense confrontation,” Savage in Limbo will prove the perfect roller-coaster ride to pass an evening, and we can promise the drinks will be on-point, as always.
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Wednesday, October 10, 2018

ArtPOP welcomes Helen the Dragon to Hillside playground with community party

Posted By on Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 1:00 AM

ArtPOP: Helen Hunt Phase Two Celebration, Oct. 11, 4-7 p.m., Helen Hunt School, 917 E. Moreno Ave., free, concretecouch.org. - STEVE WOOD
  • Steve Wood
  • ArtPOP: Helen Hunt Phase Two Celebration, Oct. 11, 4-7 p.m., Helen Hunt School, 917 E. Moreno Ave., free, concretecouch.org.
When District 11 closed the 114-year-old Helen Hunt Elementary School in 2016 and sold it to the Lane Foundation, the intent was always to ensure it remains a community space serving the Hillside neighborhood. To help execute that vision, local DIY art and community service organization Concrete Couch took on the task of revamping the playground to not only remain inviting to neighborhood kids, but to attract families to the old school, which now houses multiple community-minded nonprofits. Phase one of the playground project, completed last year, included building swings, a climbing tower, slides and more, all inspired by the design input of neighborhood kids and teens. Phase two, which Concrete Couch and Hillside volunteers finished this summer, called for the building of a massive dragon sculpture and slide — appropriately named “Helen the Dragon.” Help Concrete Couch celebrate phase two’s success with a community get-together at the playground, including live music by the Concrete Couch Jam Band, a barbecue and potluck and family activities. Concrete Couch director Steve Wood says attendees can also 
participate in model-making for phase three, which includes creating a cool new gate for the playground.
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