Monday, December 24, 2018

The Citywide Kwanza Celebration is your chance to gather around the concept of unity

Posted By on Mon, Dec 24, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Umoja Opening Ceremony: Citywide Kwanzaa Celebration, 6-8 p.m., Hillside Community Center, 925 S. Institute St., free, cospringskwanzaa.org. - CSCKC
  • CSCKC
  • Umoja Opening Ceremony: Citywide Kwanzaa Celebration, 6-8 p.m., Hillside Community Center, 925 S. Institute St., free, cospringskwanzaa.org.
This November, one of our DiverseCity contributors Zahria Rogers attended a pre-Kwanzaa event hosted by the Colorado Springs Citywide Kwanzaa Celebration. While browsing local black-owned businesses and connecting with African-American artists and artisans, Rogers set out to learn the ins and outs of this oft-misunderstood holiday. She writes: “Maybe more events like these would decrease the number of people who think Kwanzaa is a black Christmas.” Now in its 29th year, the CSCKC will offer the wider community plentiful opportunities to participate in, enjoy and understand Kwanzaa (celebrated nationwide Dec. 26 through Jan. 1).
Wednesday’s opening ceremony encourages the community to gather around the concept of “umoja,” which means “unity.” It is the first of the Nguzo Saba, the seven principles upon which Kwanzaa is based. “Unity is both a principle and practice of togetherness in all things good and of mutual benefit,” CSCKC said in event promotions last year. “It is a principled and harmonious togetherness, not simply being together.” Celebrate unity tonight with the area’s African-American artists, musicians and business owners, and keep an eye out for other CSCKC events leading up to the first of the year.
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Friday, December 21, 2018

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo's Electric Safari makes USA Today 10Best list

Posted By on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 at 3:26 PM

COURTESY CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN ZOO
  • Courtesy Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Once again, a Springs attraction has made its way to a prestigious — if in this case quite specific — top-10 list. USA Today announced on Dec. 21 that Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s annual Electric Safari was voted one of the best zoo light events in the country. They ranked fifth after a period of public voting.

This is the third year in a row that Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has made the list.

During Electric Safari, the zoo’s annual holiday attraction, 50 acres of zoo property are covered with 85 unique light sculptures and copious decorations, and the zoo provides extra experiences like animal demonstrations and visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus.

Folks can enjoy the special light sculptures and longer zoo hours through Tuesday, Jan. 1, and meet Santa through Dec. 23. See below for a schedule of animal demonstrations and keeper talks, occurring throughout the event’s run:

Mondays
6:30 p.m. – Otter Enrichment (Rocky Mountain Wild)
7:30 p.m. – Skunk Enrichment (The Loft)

Tuesdays
6:30 p.m. – African Lion Keeper Talk (African Rift Valley)
7:30 p.m. – Bird Show (The Loft)

Wednesdays
6:30 p.m. – Elephant Keeper Talk (Encounter Africa)
7:30 p.m. – Skunk Enrichment (The Loft)

Thursdays
6:30 p.m. – African Lion Keeper Talk (African Rift Valley)
7:30 p.m. – Bird Show (The Loft)
Fridays
6 p.m. – Amur Tiger Enrichment (Asian Highlands)
7 p.m. – Skunk Enrichment (The Loft)
8 p.m. – Coati Enrichment (Monkey Pavilion)

Saturdays
6 p.m. – Reptile Encounter (Scutes Family Gallery)
7 p.m. – Bird Show (The Loft)
8 p.m. – African Lion Keeper Talk (Monkey Pavilion)

Sundays
6 p.m. – Elephant Keeper Talk (Encounter Africa)
7 p.m. – Mountain Lion Enrichment (Rocky Mountain Wild)
8 p.m. – Moose Keeper Talk (Rocky Mountain Wild)
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Thursday, December 20, 2018

A Colorado Nutcracker gives a classic tale a Colorado twist

Posted By on Thu, Dec 20, 2018 at 1:00 AM

A Colorado Nutcracker, Dec. 22, 2 and 7 p.m.; and Dec. 23, 1 and 5 p.m.; Pikes Peak Center, 190 S. Cascade Ave., $19.50-$48.50, pikespeakcenter.com. - TED MEHL OF A BETTER IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Ted Mehl of A Better Image Photography
  • A Colorado Nutcracker, Dec. 22, 2 and 7 p.m.; and Dec. 23, 1 and 5 p.m.; Pikes Peak Center, 190 S. Cascade Ave., $19.50-$48.50, pikespeakcenter.com.
It takes a special artistic flair to transform traditions — especially those best-loved during the holidays — into something a little different, while maintaining respect for where it came from. Everyone and their kid knows the story of The Nutcracker, how a little girl’s toy nutcracker comes to life, battles a mouse king and takes her on a dreamy holiday adventure. But A Colorado Nutcracker is a special invention of the Colorado Ballet Society, and takes place in 19th-century Colorado. The show includes characters from our state’s history, like Colorado Springs’ founder Gen. William Jackson Palmer and inventor Nikola Tesla. This year’s production features more than 170 dancers from the Colorado Ballet Society and the Colorado Youth Ballet, 60 musicians with the Chamber Orchestra of the Springs, and vocalists of the Colorado Springs Chorale. Ballet Society founder and director Patricia Hoffman says: “We are pleased that this beloved ballet features both the unique heritage of the Front Range region and showcases local talent. This production celebrates both our roots and our future as a community.”
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United Court of the Pikes Peak Empire is hosting a Victorian-themed celebration of the holiday

Posted By on Thu, Dec 20, 2018 at 1:00 AM

A Victorian Christmas: A Costume Affair, 7-10 p.m., Club Q, 3430 N. Academy - SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
  • Shutterstock.com
  • A Victorian Christmas: A Costume Affair, 7-10 p.m., Club Q, 3430 N. Academy
I don’t know about y’all, but the last time I felt Christmas cheer was when I watched “Christmas at Downton Abbey,” a holiday special episode of the popular British period drama’s second season. Aside from the fact that it was during that episode that Matthew finally proposed to Mary, there’s something about the old British grandeur in period pieces that just makes Christmas feel a little more authentic. Saturday, the United Court of the Pikes Peak Empire invites you to create your own period-piece atmosphere, with a Victorian-themed celebration of the holiday. Of course, being UCPPE, this means fancy gowns, humor, booze, fun and of course drag performances by some of our local favorite kings and queens. Your hosts will be UCPPE’s Dowager Empress XXIV, Lauren Ashley, and “The Lady of the ‘80s” Andrea Starz, who we assume will dress for the 1880s rather than the 1980s for this special event. In addition to the show and a potluck buffet, they’ll offer silent and live auctions to benefit the UCPPE Regent Fund, which supports area nonprofits.
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Wednesday, December 19, 2018

The Christmas Truce of 1914 tells the tale of those who lived it

Posted By on Wed, Dec 19, 2018 at 1:00 AM

All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914, 7 p.m., Ent Center for the Arts, 5225 N. Nevada Ave., tickets start at $27.50, uccspresents.org. - DAN NORMAN
  • Dan Norman
  • All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914, 7 p.m., Ent Center for the Arts, 5225 N. Nevada Ave., tickets start at $27.50, uccspresents.org.
Many soldiers thought World War I, which started in July 1914, would be over by Christmas, but fighting continued throughout the months, and many of these soldiers had to spend their holiday on a battlefield. But on the evening of Dec. 24, and throughout the next day, many troops on both sides initiated a Christmas cease-fire — without the permission of their superiors. Stories abound of Allied and German soldiers playing soccer together, sharing sweets and cigarettes or helping bury each other’s dead. This remarkable and impromptu truce — never again repeated during the war — has served as a reminder that some aspects of humanity will always unite us, such as the indomitable urge to find beauty in terrible times.
Playwright Peter Rothstein immortalized this event in his 2007 musical, All Is Calm: The Christmas Truce of 1914, which made its off-Broadway debut this year. Using pieces of letters, autobiographies and radio broadcasts interwoven with Christmas songs and trench tunes, All Is Calm presents the tale in the words of the people who lived it. “For decades, the truce was considered a romantic fable, fiction,” Rothstein told Playbill in July, “and I wanted to give legitimate voice to this remarkable moment that had somehow been denied its rightful place in history. I cannot express how gratifying it has been to share the story of these heroic men, in their own words, across the country and around the globe.” Rothstein’s theater company, Theater Latté Da, will be bringing this production to the Ent Center for the Arts Wednesday night only.
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Cripple Creek’s new Christmas Casino and a conversation about the holiday

Posted By on Wed, Dec 19, 2018 at 1:00 AM

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December in Las Vegas means a few things, but for the casino business, it’s the quiet season.

“There was a saying in Las Vegas that Santa Claus and slot machines don’t mix,” says Dan Lee, CEO and president of Full House Resorts, which owns Bronco Billy’s and other casinos. But he’s bucked that saying, and his company has reopened the former Imperial Casino in Cripple Creek as the Christmas Casino and Inn, which will operate year-round. It’s bold, but he thinks Vegas slowing down in December is as much a product of cooler temperatures and office parties clogging the calendar as the sanctity of the season.

As inspiration, Lee cites past holiday visits to Germany — namely the 500-year-old annual Christkindlesmarkt (Christmas market) in Nuremberg and the German Christmas museum in Rothenburg ob der Tauber. He’s also tested the idea of a Christmas casino as a seasonal concept at the Rising Star Casino Resort in Indiana, where it’s moved November and December financial figures from red into black for four years.

So far, he says he’s had no complaints, either about the Indiana pop-up or the Christmas Casino. He says it’s because they’ve stayed well clear of any religious connotations; there’s no slot-side midnight mass or anything of the kind.

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“We think the recognition of the birth of Christ is phenomenal and [that] people should go to church,” he says. “But people are not at church every day.”

Rather, Lee says his research led him to non-Christian midwinter celebrations. Their purpose, he says, was in part to bring communities close to make winter pass more easily. Slaughtering a few livestock animals for feasting meant fewer mouths eating through winter stores, and the cold helped it keep longer. No harvest meant there was time for knitting and toymaking. And a little tipple helped keep the cold off.

If there is a universal truth to the idea of holiday spirit, it’s in coming together to celebrate camaraderie, peace and love, and to make the darkest days of the year more bearable. And in that, to each their own.
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Friday, December 14, 2018

Independence Center's Art of Accessibility program honored by Colorado Business Committee for the Arts

Posted By on Fri, Dec 14, 2018 at 5:16 PM

CAYC WOLFF
  • CayC Wolff

On Dec. 11, the Colorado Business Committee For the Arts, which encourages collaboration between businesses and arts organizations in order to elevate the arts throughout Colorado, announced its 2019 Business for the Arts Award honorees.

Among the six winners: The Independence Center, an Indy Give! nonprofit based right here in Colorado Springs. The Independence Center provides resources, services and community events to people living with disabilities in the Pikes Peak region, and advocates for their rights. Among their diverse programs, which include independent living services, health care resources and more, they offer an “Art of Accessibility” program.

Here’s what The Independence Center has to say about the program, in part:

Over the past two years, the Art of Accessibility initiative has invited and celebrated local people with disabilities as practitioners of art. By using the Independence Center itself as a pop-up gallery, the greater Colorado Springs community has been empowered to consider those questions of access and inclusion through the inviting and universal lens of art.

Though arts programming falls well outside its mission or range of experience, the Independence Center used this outreach tool more and more effectively with each successive iteration of the Art of Accessibility (AoA), which grew from a one-off exhibit into a semiannual festival of inclusive creative expression, from tactile paintings to adaptive fashion design to music and dance. At each juncture the arts served as a font of joy and a tool for advocacy, with intriguing results.

We wrote about one of AoA’s initiatives recently, a photo project meant to document barriers to accessibility throughout the community, as well as situations in which people with disabilities felt empowered and seen.

The CBCA honored The Independence Center for the entirety of the Art of Accessibility initiative, which will no doubt help the organization create their template “so other communities across Colorado can use their local arts scene as a driver for inclusion. “

Awards will be given to all honorees at a luncheon in March at the Denver Performing Arts Complex. See the full list of honorees on the CBCA website.
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Thursday, December 13, 2018

The Modbo Ho Ho is back to bust the seasonal monotony

Posted By on Thu, Dec 13, 2018 at 10:00 AM

The Modbo Ho Ho: A Christmas 
Cabaret for Grown-Ups, Shows at 7 and 9:30 p.m., The Modbo, 17C E. Bijou St., $15, email, themodbo@gmail.com to reserve tickets, themodbo.com. - LAUREN CIBOROWSKI
  • Lauren Ciborowski
  • The Modbo Ho Ho: A Christmas 
Cabaret for Grown-Ups, Shows at 7 and 9:30 p.m., The Modbo, 17C E. Bijou St., $15, email, themodbo@gmail.com to reserve tickets, themodbo.com.
While sugary sweetness and sentiment has its place in holiday celebrations (that place being, well, everywhere), it’s nice to get a little irreverent now and again. As the warm-hearted messages of familial love and selfless gift-giving roll in, we are always grateful when it comes time for the annual Modbo Ho Ho, a show that swoops in like a wrecking ball to bust through the seasonal monotony. Featuring variety performances from local stars such as Joy Armstrong and Max Ferguson, plus the raunchy musical stylings of dynamic duo Swelter and Burn, this adults-only cabaret blends music and dance to create an alternative but no less festive celebration. Modbo owner (and one half of Swelter and Burn) Lauren Ciborowski does promise “a few brief moments of holiday earnestness,” but if you want to admit you’re attending just to see a sexually liberated Santa Claus we promise we won’t judge you. “Fun for the whole family,” says artist Jo Carol Ciborowski, Lauren Ciborowski’s mother, “as long as your family is over 18.”
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Wednesday, December 12, 2018

The Long Christmas Ride Home is a poignant exploration of family during the holidays

Posted By on Wed, Dec 12, 2018 at 4:00 PM

The Long Christmas Ride Home, Dec. 13-15, 7:30 p.m., CC’s Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., $5, free for students, coloradocollege.edu. - COURTESY KEVIN LANDIS
  • Courtesy Kevin Landis
  • The Long Christmas Ride Home, Dec. 13-15, 7:30 p.m., CC’s Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., $5, free for students, coloradocollege.edu.
Most holiday plays, movies and music tend to emphasize the importance of family, whether painting over traditional holiday gatherings with a coat of nostalgia or reminding people that family, especially toxic family, is not an obligation. The Long Christmas Ride Home, a 2003 play by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel, presents a very realistic — and all the sadder for it — picture of family life that we don’t tend to see in holiday shows on either end of that spectrum, though Vogel insists its setting does not necessarily make it a “Christmas” play. In a car driving to see grandparents on Christmas Eve, a family on the verge of breaking airs its troubles; and it is in that car that they must come to terms with those troubles, too. Far from rehashing the road trip setting found in plays such as Thornton Wilder’s The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden — which Vogel credits as an influence — this play proves unique. Perhaps most notably, it employs the art of bunraku, traditional Japanese puppet theater, in a way few contemporary and even fewer Western shows would dare. The three children in the backseat, all dealing with their parents’ drama differently, are at first represented by puppets. Then, as they grow and age, the puppeteers replace those puppets as actors. Under the expert direction of UCCS’ Kevin Landis, this Colorado College student play should prove a poignant exploration of family during the holidays and otherwise. Perhaps it will even answer the question of how we as people grow from familial trauma, before many head home for the holidays.
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Show Us Your Shorts showcases the region’s newest and coolest short films

Posted By on Wed, Dec 12, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Show Us Your Shorts - 6-9 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, facebook.com/PeakFilmForum. - COURTESY PETE SCHUERMANN
  • Courtesy Pete Schuermann
  • Show Us Your Shorts6-9 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, facebook.com/PeakFilmForum.
While national and international film festivals offer plentiful opportunities to hear from diverse voices, not everyone realizes the breadth of filmmaking talent we have right here in the Pikes Peak region. Quarterly screenings from the Peak Film Forum — a group that exists to connect area filmmakers with others in the craft, sponsored by the Independent Film Society of Colorado — offer a variety of short films made by folks right here in our community. This week, check out new work from locals like Adam Raynes, Joey Partridge, Megan MacGrath and more, running the gamut from comedy to horror to whatever in between. Filmmakers can take notes at post-screening Q&As and connect with others in the field; prospective filmmakers can get to know the locals who have found filmmaking success; and those not interested in taking up the craft themselves can still see a showcase of the region’s newest and coolest short films. When we support local art, everyone wins.
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Friday, December 7, 2018

Get ready to let it go with IFOC's Children’s Holiday Film Festival

Posted By on Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Children’s Holiday Film Festival, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, etfest.com. - COURTESY BLISSFEST333
  • Courtesy Blissfest333
  • Children’s Holiday Film Festival, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St., free, etfest.com.
Film festivals don’t have to be stuffy or overly concerned with the artistic value of film in order to present, well, artistically valuable films. Sometimes, it’s worth it just to get together and watch a whole host of fun movies with like-minded individuals — or families, in this case. Denver-based event company Blissfest333, the Independent Film Society of Colorado and the historic Elitch Theatre understand this well, and have teamed up to put together a lineup of kids’ films for the holidays. Selected from the best shorts presented at the Children’s Day International Film Festival, the jam-packed, three-block lineup includes films ranging from Sooper Peeps, directed by Denver’s James Schuler, to Beggars by Indian director Ram Prasad Mandal. Also included: five films by featured local filmmakers Kaelen Becker and her grandfather Bob Becker, and five films by featured filmmaker Nathaniel Shields. All three should be around to talk about their work. Should your child hope for a more traditional holiday experience, no worries. The festival will include holiday activities at 1 p.m. and a screening of Disney’s Frozen at 2 p.m. Get ready to let it go, parents. It’s a sing-along.
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Art in the Park is your chance to take advantage of the generous Colorado winter

Posted By on Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Art in the Park, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, 15807 Teller County Road 1, Florissant, $7/adult, free for kids, nps.gov/flfo. - COURTESY FLORISSANT FOSSIL BEDS NATIONAL MONUMENT
  • Courtesy Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument
  • Art in the Park, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, 15807 Teller County Road 1, Florissant, $7/adult, free for kids, nps.gov/flfo.
Whenever we think the weather won’t hold out, the sunshine tends to come surging back, which should be a blessing for Florissant Fossil Beds’ upcoming en plein air arting event. This is your chance to take advantage of the generous Colorado winter in one of the region’s most beautiful national parks. With volunteer artists on hand, plus a limited supply of art materials for visitors, Florissant Fossil Beds invites community members of all ages and artistic abilities to this drop-in day. Park guests can take inspiration from their natural surroundings, and watch an advanced artist or two sketch or watercolor their way through a piece. Should you like to bring your own art supplies, you’re welcome to do so, but you may want to bring a folding chair, too. Though limited seating will be available, there should be plenty of open space.
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Thursday, December 6, 2018

Independence Center and Hear Here Poetry join forces for Give! celebration

Posted By on Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Give! The Gift of a Creative Community, 6-7:30 p.m., Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 
30 W. Dale St., free, facebook.com/TheIndependenceCenter. - TIM ASHLEY
  • Tim Ashley
  • Give! The Gift of a Creative Community, 6-7:30 p.m., Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 
30 W. Dale St., free, facebook.com/TheIndependenceCenter.
Collaboration often proves to be a benefit of the Give! Campaign, the nonprofit civic arm of Indy parent company Colorado Publishing House. Each year, participating organizations with different missions use this opportunity to combine their talents and their purposes into something new. In this case, The Independence Center, which provides services to people with disabilities, and Hear Here Poetry, a collective of spoken-word poets, have come together for a joint Give! celebration of creativity, with support from Mike’s Camera and the Bemis School of Art. At the Fine Arts Center, enjoy readings by Hear Here poets Andrew Ziegler and Nancy Perez, plus a tour of The Independence Center’s PhotoVoice Project. Launched in May 2018 and first exhibited in July, the PhotoVoice Project is meant to “shed light on those things in the daily lives of people with disabilities, which promote an accessible and inclusive space, versus those that do not,” according to The Independence Center. Through photography and the written word, local people with disabilities documented barriers to accessibility they encountered throughout their daily lives, as well as moments they felt seen and hopeful. Viewing the project should provide ample opportunity to understand the importance of The Independence Center’s services, all while enjoying artwork and poetry by locals. 
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Arts Alley plays host to Small Works XI

Posted By on Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:00 AM

Friday  Small Works XI, Opening reception, 5:30 p.m. to midnight, on display through Jan. 4, The Modbo and S.P.Q.R., 17B and 17C E. Bijou St., themodbo.com. - COURTESY LAUREN CIBOROWSKI
  • Courtesy Lauren Ciborowski
  • Friday Small Works XI, Opening reception, 5:30 p.m. to midnight, on display through Jan. 4, The Modbo and S.P.Q.R., 17B and 17C E. Bijou St., themodbo.com.
For nine years now, two favorite downtown galleries have come together for a special holiday season buy-and-take show. The Modbo and S.P.Q.R., though no longer officially connected through their programming, always share the wall space required for the more than 500 unique pieces of artwork submitted to their annual Small Works exhibition. Each year, nearly 150 local artists create pieces that measure less than 24 inches in every dimension, and soon those pieces will pack the walls of both Arts Alley galleries. “Where else can you shop local, support local artists and local galleries, and knock out presents for nearly everyone on your list?!” asks Lauren Ciborowski, owner of The Modbo. Since folks will be taking their purchases home with them, the best time to check out the full spread will be First Friday’s opening reception. Open until midnight, both galleries will have snacks, entertainment and — most importantly — truckloads of art for you to take home.
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Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Moxie adds art gallery, exhibits Springs artist Beth Eckel

Posted By on Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 1:12 PM

BETH ECKEL
  • Beth Eckel
Nearly a full year after its 2017 opening, local restaurant Moxie still has a lot going on — more, even, since they have officially established themselves as a staple of Springs vegan eating. Owned by Nissa and Mike Buth who also own Ola Juice Bar, Moxie has added a reliable plant-based dining option to the Eighth Street corridor, which — a bit south of Moxie — is also home to vegan eatery Burrowing Owl.

This week, Moxie will launch a new aspect of the business: the Moxie Art Gallery. Nissa Buth says this is the restaurant’s first big structural addition. “We’ve always had that [an art gallery] in mind, but it’s just been put on the back-burner so we can get restaurant operations where we want them,” Buth says.

She enlisted the help of her father, Dan Wecks, to establish the gallery space. He brings plenty of experience and expertise to the table, having worked with the Business of Arts Center (now the Manitou Arts Center), the Kennedy Center and Imagination Celebration.

Opening Dec. 6, the Moxie Art Gallery will feature its first artist: recent Colorado Springs transplant Beth Eckel. Hailing from Dallas, Texas, Eckel works in mixed media, creating unique realistic artwork on a canvas of book pages and sheet music.

Opening night will also feature a special Moxie menu, so you can enjoy some vegan fare with your art.

Buth says they plan to rotate artists monthly, and she encourages local artists to get in touch if they are interested in exhibiting on Moxie’s walls. Interested artists can get in touch through Moxie’s website.

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