Thursday, January 31, 2019

Abigail Kreuser's moving onward and upward the only way she knows how

Posted By on Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Gratitude, Opening reception, 5-9 p.m., on display through Feb. 22, Kreuser Gallery’s new location, 125 E. Boulder St., free, abigailkreusergallery.com. - RAMON AGUIRRE
  • Ramon Aguirre
  • Gratitude, Opening reception, 5-9 p.m., on display through Feb. 22, Kreuser Gallery’s new location, 125 E. Boulder St., free, abigailkreusergallery.com.
Almost eight years ago, local photographer Abigail Kreuser first opened the doors of her Colorado Avenue art gallery, drawing the Springs arts scene under the bridge to enjoy a diverse array of art by local creatives. She has provided a venue for art of all mediums, modes and meanings, and built up the Depot Arts District (which also includes The Bridge Gallery and the new Under the Bridge Collective) into a must-visit First Friday destination. Now, it’s time for her to move onward and upward, and — in true Kreuser fashion — she plans to thank everyone who has helped her along the way.
Opening just in time for February’s First Friday, Kreuser’s new location at 125 E. Boulder St. should prove bigger and better than ever, stocked full of artwork by more than 100 local artists. The show, Gratitude, reflects styles across the spectrum, including paintings by Shannon Dunn and Steve Weed, sculpture by Sean O’Meallie, photography by Brian Tryon and plenty more. The exhibit’s opening reception will include live music by local Americana band Phosphene Eyes, and at 7 p.m. Jasmine Dillavou will present a performance art piece: Reclamation of Sif. Drawing on the Norse story of Sif, a goddess whose power Loki stripped away by cutting her hair, Dillavou will perform a “spiritual bath,” a ritual used in Yoruba Santeria that is meant “to help women find their power, be healed, take control.”

Should you miss the opening reception, stop by the new space throughout the month anyway. It’s rare to see this many local artists represented on a gallery’s walls.
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You have no reason not to go to GalaxyFest

Posted By on Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 1:00 AM

GalaxyFest, Feb. 1-3, times vary, The Antlers hotel, 4 S. Cascade Ave., free-$199, galaxyfest.org. - COURTESY GALAXYFEST
  • Courtesy GalaxyFest
  • GalaxyFest, Feb. 1-3, times vary, The Antlers hotel, 4 S. Cascade Ave., free-$199, galaxyfest.org.
Each year, GalaxyFest gathers the city’s geeks and hosts a jam-packed weekend of events. With authors, artists, celebrities, cosplay contests, mermaid demonstrations, panels, workshops and more, it’s well worth its ticket price and the inevitable emptiness you’re bound to feel once the convention doors close. This year, look forward to appearances by special guests Noah Hathaway (The NeverEnding Story) and Sainty Nelsen (The Bay), as well as GalaxyFest alumni Tracee Lee Cocco (Star Trek) and Michael Copon (Power Rangers Time Force). Plus, for those over the age of 18, this year’s AfterDark party includes burlesque, kilt bowling and a special performance by Japanese rock band Kazha. Looking for something a little less adult? Sunday is family day, with activities and kid-friendly exhibitors, and kids under 12 get in free with a paid adult.
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Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Rialto Theater Players bring a family favorite to an inspiring old venue

Posted By on Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Little Women, Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m., through Feb. 10, Rialto Theater, 209 W. Main St., Florence, $10-$12, historicrialtotheater.org. - RIALTO THEATER FACEBOOK
  • Rialto Theater Facebook
  • Little Women, Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m., through Feb. 10, Rialto Theater, 209 W. Main St., Florence, $10-$12, historicrialtotheater.org.
It’s hard to go wrong with a play like Little Women, the story of a family facing all the struggles of the Civil War, from an absent father to the threat of scarlet fever. And the Rialto Theater Players are poised to go very, very right for their production of this classic tale. While the Rialto Theater space is still in the process of a long renovation, the hard work hasn’t stopped them from putting on successful quarterly plays in an area of Fremont County that could do with some more theater. With a set furnished through loans from local antique stores (which, in Florence, have a heck of a selection) and a cast enriched by local teens playing the parts of the four March sisters, this should prove an effective and easy family favorite at a truly inspiring old venue.
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Thursday, January 24, 2019

Anniversary exhibits showcase dynamic history of Fine Arts Center

Posted By on Thu, Jan 24, 2019 at 3:26 PM

Anniversaries can mean different things — joy, remembrance, even sorrow. For the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, their year-long 100th anniversary celebration seeks to honor the rich cultural history of the region, and the people and events that shaped its growth from the Broadmoor Art Academy in 1919 to the FAC in 1936, and beyond.


For curator of modern and contemporary art, Joy Armstrong, this means crafting a series of four museum exhibits that tell a story of always-evolving artistic ideals across a century.

O Beautiful! Shifting Landscapes of the Pikes Peak Region follows a timeline from around 1870-1970, examining the earliest artists in the region, why they came and how their artistic ideals started to coalesce. In those early years, tracing the artists is fairly equivalent to tracing the history of the academy and FAC. They were founding personalities, board members and key figures in the transition from the academy to FAC, helping develop the region’s art identity.
Another component of the exhibit is “shifting perspectives,” sidebars that provoke attendees to be critical of historical truth, reexamine the art from our modern perspective and explore their own alternative viewpoints.

The second exhibit opening of the year, Scenes from Life: Drawings by Bernard Arnest, is a series of 51 large drawings that showcase his reactions to a world he decided was essentially tragic.

“[Scenes] is really a demonstration of his thoughtfulness as an artist,” Armstrong says. “They are difficult works to be with — he was responding to the global events of the '70s — but they feel contemporary.”

Arnest served as both the head of the FAC Art School (which became the Colorado College Art Department) and professor of art at Colorado College.

Bernard Arnest instructs a class, circa 1950-60s. - COURTESY OF THE COLORADO COLLEGE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
  • Courtesy of the Colorado College Special Collections
  • Bernard Arnest instructs a class, circa 1950-60s.

Notes from the Musick Collection will open Aug. 3. Archie Musick was a student at the academy, and had relationships with many of the founding characters. He even published a book — Musick Medley: Intimate Memories of a Rocky Mountain Art Colony, which looks at his experiences and local contemporaries in an entertaining tabloid format.

In concert with his daughter Pat, the exhibit will focus on the family collection Archie accumulated through the years, which includes art but also historical FAC artifacts, including diaries, announcements and postcards.

The Broadmoor Art Academy and Its Legacy, 1919-1970 will premiere in the middle of Arts Month this October, focusing on how the artists that studied and worked in the area influenced each other, and how that influence spread throughout the country and across time. It’ll include private and public works, with pieces from the Smithsonian and Denver Art Museum.

“This will really demonstrate the influence of the academy,” Armstrong says. “It’ll look at the art artists brought with them to the region and what they learned and experienced while they were here, and what they did when they moved on. There was a really powerful impact on the development of American art identity.”

A class of the Broadmoor Art Academy out and about. - LAURA GILPIN, ©AMON CARTER MUSEUM, COURTESY OF THE FINE ARTS CENTER
  • Laura Gilpin, ©Amon Carter Museum, Courtesy of the Fine Arts Center
  • A class of the Broadmoor Art Academy out and about.

This exhibit will also explore how artistic approaches that are now widely accepted may have been reviled and misunderstood in their time.

“We can look to the past to come to terms with the styles,” Armstrong says. “There is this continuity in the continuum of art history — if we can understand where things come from, then hopefully we can at least appreciate them.”

Part of Armstrong’s work is to look forward, to where she sees the FAC in the future, both through these exhibits and beyond.


“We are product of what has come before. [These shows] allow us an opportunity to see what they are as part of the era gone by, though they may be offensive or shocking now. We don’t condone them, but we can dig into them and attempt to understand where they come from and where they’ve gone,” Armstrong says.

One of the growing challenges for cultural institutions Armstrong sees is growing competition for time, attention and dollars.

“We can no longer expect that when we do something we feel is important, that people will come to us,” Armstrong says. “We have to ask questions of ourselves and be open to criticism.”

The Fine Arts Center lobby in the 1930s. - COURTESY OF THE COLORADO COLLEGE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
  • Courtesy of the Colorado College Special Collections
  • The Fine Arts Center lobby in the 1930s.

Beyond preserving the existing collection and remembering their core values, Armstrong hopes the FAC seeks out new opportunities — to intentionally reach new audiences and serve the whole community, take risks with challenging and provocative work, and utilize technology to evolve the role of the museum. And, fight the notion that a museum is full of dusty objects that you possibly can’t relate to. It is a place for learning, connecting, experiencing and growing.

“There are different ways to view what a museum does. It’s a shift from museum as temple, playground of the elite, and exclusive to museum as classroom, community center,” she says.

“I’ll be disappointed if, in 100 years, we are what we are today.”

But why, now, come to the FAC?

“People from any background can develop a relationship with something that will leave an impact," Armstrong says. "You won’t like everything, but there will be something you fall in love with.”

Exhibit Schedule
Through 2019 | O Beautiful! Shifting Landscapes of the Pikes Peak Region
Through June 9 | Scenes from Life: Drawings by Bernard Arnest
Opening Aug. 3 | Notes from the Musick Collection
Opening Oct. 12 | The Broadmoor Art Academy and Its Legacy, 1919-1970

Public Open House & Museum Free Day - 100th Anniversary Kick-Off Event
Saturday, January 26

  • Guided tours of featured exhibitions O Beautiful! Shifting Landscapes of the Pikes Peak Region and Scenes of Everyday Life: Drawings by Bernard Arnest at 12 and 12:30 p.m.
  • One-act play reading of the first play performed by the Academy Players in 1919, Suppressed Desires, in the galleries at 1 and 3 p.m.
  • Hands-on art activities and demonstrations 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Complimentary hot beverages and sweet treats 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Taste open for lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jonathan Toman serves as the Peak Radar Manager for the Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region. PeakRadar.com connects you to over 4,500 local events, 450 creative groups, & 350 artists — all in one beautiful website for the Pikes Peak region. Jonathan can be reached at jonathan@culturaloffice.org.

To sign up for the weekly Peak Radar Picks email, which includes 8-10 great local events, click here.
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Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Borscht Belted offers a glimpse into a an exciting period of American comedy

Posted By on Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Borscht Belted, Jan. 24-26, 7:30 p.m., Jan. 27, 2:30 p.m., Millibo Art Theatre, 1626 S. Tejon St., $18-$25, themat.org. - COURTESY MILLIBO ART THEATRE
  • Courtesy Millibo Art Theatre
  • Borscht Belted, Jan. 24-26, 7:30 p.m., Jan. 27, 2:30 p.m., Millibo Art Theatre, 1626 S. Tejon St., $18-$25, themat.org.
Actor, journalist and playwright Warren Epstein doesn’t want the world to forget his hometown, but not just because of the memories it holds for him, personally. Because he grew up in the Catskills, also known as the “Borscht Belt,” in New York, during one of the most innovative and exciting periods of American comedy, Epstein knows his experiences and the history he witnessed matter to the world outside the mountains. “It’s funny about when you grow up in a place that’s unique,” Epstein says, “you think everything is entirely normal. So to me, Milton Berle playing on Saturday a few blocks from my house — that was just another Saturday night.” Milton Berle, along with comedians like Woody Allen, Jerry Seinfeld, Joan Rivers and Marc Maron got their start in the Catskills resorts, where the Jewish population of New York would go to unwind. The Catskills comedy scene has long since died away, leaving empty hotels and a fading legacy. Epstein says: “I’m realizing that my memory and my experience, along with the historic significance of it, you know, it called me to do something theatrically about it.”
Channeling these comedians and his own memories of sneaking into comedy shows and working in famous hotels, Epstein has created a one-man show to honor both the famous and the forgotten Borscht Belt funnymen who changed the landscape of American comedy. The audience can look forward to meeting Jimmy Grecco, Epstein’s composite of the comedic personalities he knew and witnessed, who will narrate a journey through a formative piece of theatrical history. It’s an important story for Epstein to tell, and not just because it connects to his childhood. It connects to his heritage, and the shared heritage of many American Jews.

Epstein says that the community in the Catskills grew in large part out of World War II. “As a people and a culture, it was about comedy. This was our way to express. When we ran out of tears, we found we could laugh. And I think that’s been a guiding culture of our people for a long, long time.”
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Rumor is Funky's current production should be a cathartic laugh-fest

Posted By on Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Neil Simon’s Rumors, Thursdays-Sundays, 7:30 p.m., through Feb. 9, Funky Little Theater Company, 1367 Pecan St., $15-$19, funkylittletheater.org. - CHRIS MEDINA
  • Chris Medina
  • Neil Simon’s Rumors, Thursdays-Sundays, 7:30 p.m., through Feb. 9, Funky Little Theater Company, 1367 Pecan St., $15-$19, funkylittletheater.org.
It may not be classy to give credence to rumors, but word on the street is that Neil Simon’s 1988 farce, Rumors, hits all the right comedic beats for a night out at the theater. And, in spite of its well-off and well-dressed cast of characters, Rumors isn’t so classy at all. The audience first meets Ken and Chris Gorman, the first couple to arrive at the New York City deputy mayor’s home, where he and his wife Myra are celebrating their 10th anniversary. But the situation immediately deteriorates when the Gormans find that Myra is missing, and Charlie seems to have shot himself in the head. Determined to smooth over the situation, the Gormans make it irrefutably worse as more guests arrive and the rumor mill spins them all into a corner. In the decidedly talented hands of Funky Little Theater Company’s players, Rumors should be a cathartic laugh-fest. Who doesn’t love to see the rich and powerful taken down a peg?
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Down and Dirty Below is Gallery Below's most provocative event ever

Posted By on Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Erotic Cabaret, 8-10 p.m., The Gallery Below, 718B N. Weber St., $15, facebook.com/thegallerybelow. - COURTESY THE GALLERY BELOW
  • Courtesy The Gallery Below
  • Erotic Cabaret, 8-10 p.m., The Gallery Below, 718B N. Weber St., $15, facebook.com/thegallerybelow.
Looking to fight off the winter chill? Well, things are getting hot down at the Gallery Below. They started January with the opening of NSFW: Down and Dirty Below, an exhibit of erotic and fetish artwork unlike any you’re likely to see on another local gallery’s walls. But, since the Gallery Below is never one to use its safe word when the party’s just getting started, they’ve now partnered with Voodoo Leatherworks to host a very spicy cabaret in the gallery space. Enjoy “fetish tasting” stations, where you can take part in safe practice demonstrations for all kinds of appetites, and make sure to strap yourself in for the floor show. Magnum Missile will offer up a delectable drag performance, comedian Anthony Crawford will keep things light, and burlesque dancers Ben Kaufman, Foxie Dreame, Romeo Uncaged and Holly M. Amorous will put the cherries on top of a delicious evening. Gallery manager Jon Bataille calls this “the sexiest, most provocative event the gallery has ever hosted.” So, yeah, you’ll probably want to be there.
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Thursday, January 17, 2019

COSine brings accomplished authors and scientists to convention one last time

Posted By on Thu, Jan 17, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Jan. 18-20, times vary, Hotel Eleganté Conference and Event Center, 2886 S. Circle Drive, free-$15/child, $35-$45/adult, firstfridayfandom.org.
  • Jan. 18-20, times vary, Hotel Eleganté Conference and Event Center, 2886 S. Circle Drive, free-$15/child, $35-$45/adult, firstfridayfandom.org.
Sci-fi and fantasy conventions often place emphasis on film and TV, but our very own local COSine, while it celebrates all forms of media and art, has amassed a treasure trove of frequent guests who specialize in the literary arts and in real-life science, making it stand out from the pack. Hosted by First Friday Fandom, a local group of monthly-meeting sci-fi fans, COSine has brought accomplished sci-fi and fantasy authors and well-known scientists to our fair city for 15 years. According to organizer Robin Monogue, 2019 may be the last year the group hosts this convention, as they have at least decided not to host an event in 2020, so don’t miss your chance to take advantage of the convention’s impressive lineup.
COURTESY CARRIE VAUGHN
  • Courtesy Carrie Vaughn
This year’s literary guest of honor, Carrie Vaughn, won the Philip K. Dick Award in 2018 for her novel Bannerless, while the science guest of honor, Mike Brotherton, is also an accomplished author of science fiction, as well as a professor of astronomy at the University of Wyoming. Other guests include Connie Willis, winner of 11 Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards, and her partner Courtney Willis, emeritus professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Northern Colorado. Add to these distinguished guests (and many more), a full roster of panels, workshops, board games, readings and filking — sci-fi- or fandom-themed folk music performances — and COSine really does have something for everyone.
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Luke Cissell wants to give kids a listening ear, and a little free expression

Posted By on Thu, Jan 17, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Reading and Book Release: The Story of Us – Life After Loss, Noon to 3 p.m., Hooked on Books, 10-12 E. Bijou St., free, tinyurl.com/StoryofUSCOS. - LUKE CISSEL
  • Luke Cissel
  • Reading and Book Release: The Story of Us – Life After Loss, Noon to 3 p.m., Hooked on Books, 10-12 E. Bijou St., free, tinyurl.com/StoryofUSCOS.
Local poet Luke Cissell never enjoyed English classes when he was a teenager. Traditional writing required too much structure, he says, and he found it difficult to access his thoughts and feelings when he spent his energy on spelling and punctuation. So as he has worked with youth poets, first as a part of Hear, Here! Poetry (a local spoken-word poetry organization, to which Cissell no longer belongs) and now with teens serving time in detention facilities, he has encouraged a free expression of thought through poetry. “I think the kids are a lot quicker to tap into themselves and into their stories when they’re able to just creatively write,” Cissell says. “... My goal in this free-flow, free-form style of writing will hopefully open them up to be more free with any art or form of expression that they have. To be less judgmental with it.”

Over the last three years hosting poetry workshops in youth detention facilities, Cissell has helped scores of kids express their stories to a world that consistently refuses to hear what they have to say for themselves. “All these kids are known more by, say, their rap sheets and what’s been on the news than anything else,” Cissell says. “There’s much more to the story than just the charges that they picked up and what happened the night of the crimes that they committed.” In order to increase the reach of those stories, he has put together a book from poems written by the kids who have taken his workshop: The Story of Us – Life After Loss.
At Saturday’s reading and book release, Cissell will read some of these poems, sharing stories and emotions in the teens’ own words, and he will share the insights he has gathered from his work with youths like them. More than 40 kids, between ages 11 and 18, contributed to the book. Cissell says that youths often share their struggles with each other, but important adults like teachers and parents are often left in the dark. Even those with the resources to help seldom know the extent of what kids are going through. He hopes that this book will inspire those living “on the outs” to effect real change, and ensure fewer kids end up in custody. According to Cissell, every teen is in some way an “at-risk” teen, and so many have been detrimentally affected by their environments. These youths’ stories should shed some light on how we can help make the world a little safer for the kids in our communities who most need a listening ear, and a little free expression.
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Wednesday, January 16, 2019

The Trocks are proving ballet can be a thoroughly unique experience

Posted By on Wed, Jan 16, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, 7:30-9 p.m., Sangre de Cristo Arts Center, 210 N. Santa Fe Ave., Pueblo, $24-$30, sdc-arts.org. - SASCHA VAUGHAN
  • Sascha Vaughan
  • Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, 7:30-9 p.m., Sangre de Cristo Arts Center, 210 N. Santa Fe Ave., Pueblo, $24-$30, sdc-arts.org.
Ballet doesn’t have to be a stuffy, high-class experience in order to be beautiful and evocative. Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo — or the Trocks, as they call themselves — have proved this since 1974 when they first took the stage in New York City. Since then, they have toured to more than 600 cities and more than 40 countries and collected quite the following for their totally unconventional style. Comprised entirely of men, the Trocks perform ballet classics such as Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and Don Quixote, but as parody and en travesti, which means a good portion of the cast cross-dresses, often for comedic effect. But this isn’t going to be your average drag show. While their performances are, for sure, laugh-out-loud funny, these men take their art seriously, and have the training and talent to back it up. Look forward to some incredible dancing, vibrant costumes and, above all, a thoroughly unique experience. The Seattle Times once praised: “The Trocks sit firmly at the intersection of fun and flawless dance.”
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Friday, January 11, 2019

Friends: The Musical Parody brings the goofy sextet back to life

Posted By on Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Friends: The Musical Parody, 7 p.m., Pikes Peak Center, 190 S. Cascade Ave., $53, pikespeakcenter.com. - THE INDIGO REPUBLIC
  • The Indigo Republic
  • Friends: The Musical Parody, 7 p.m., Pikes Peak Center, 190 S. Cascade Ave., $53, pikespeakcenter.com.
It seems whole generations of Americans have never quite gotten over Friends, the beloved sitcom and cultural phenomenon that aired on NBC from 1994 to 2004. For many of us who grew up with the show, it takes only the sight of Central Perk, the friends’ coffee shop of choice, or the opening chords of Phoebe’s hit song “Smelly Cat” to shoot us full of nostalgia. That might explain why Netflix reportedly paid $100 million to retain its streaming rights to the show through 2019. But if 10 seasons alone aren’t enough to slake your thirst for Friends content, look no further than the Pikes Peak Center on Monday, when a musical parody of the show will make a one-night-only stop on its tour. Capturing some of the most iconic moments from the sitcom’s long run — from Monica dancing with a turkey on her head to Ross and Rachel’s legendary first kiss — Friends: The Musical Parody brings the whole goofy sextet back to life and condenses some of their adventures into a fast-paced jaunt. While gently poking fun at them, of course.
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Amos Kennedy speaks to the power of the distributed word at CC

Posted By on Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Open House with Amos Kennedy, 3-5 p.m., The Press at Colorado College, 920 N. Cascade Ave., free, registration required, facebook.com/galleryuccs. - AMOS KENNEDY
  • Amos Kennedy
  • Open House with Amos Kennedy, 3-5 p.m., The Press at Colorado College, 920 N. Cascade Ave., free, registration required, facebook.com/galleryuccs.
Since its invention and throughout its evolution, the printmaking process has enabled the wide distribution of ideas and art, neither of which have always been accessible to all people. Printmaker Amos Kennedy, known for his provocative posters and his art’s emphasis on race and social issues, said in a 2018 interview with 20x200.com, “Printing is affordable; that is why it is printing. I like the fact that the printed material is supposed to be distributed.” Unlike other forms of art, prints can be reproduced and sold for low prices, or even given away for free. This ultimately makes it the art of the masses, even though it takes great skill to create a truly beautiful print. UCCS’ Galleries of Contemporary Art have explored that concept in their current exhibit, Gadzook!, a collection of letterpress prints by contemporary artists including Kennedy. Join him at an open house at local printmaking stronghold The Press at Colorado College, where he will be working with CC students on the studio’s letterpress, and speaking about the printmaking process and the power of the distributed word.
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Thursday, January 10, 2019

Youth Ensemble's A New Brain is your chance to help make dreams come true

Posted By on Thu, Jan 10, 2019 at 10:04 AM

A New Brain: Benefit Concert, 7:30 p.m., Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $20-$50, csfineartscenter.org. - COURTESY COLORADO SPRINGS FINE ARTS CENTER AT COLORADO COLLEGE
  • Courtesy Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College
  • A New Brain: Benefit Concert, 7:30 p.m., Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $20-$50, csfineartscenter.org.
In its 20th year, the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Youth Repertory Ensemble remains the region’s premier training program for youths who want to make a living on the stage, whether as actors or designers. Youths in the program’s age range, 14-18, might explore theater in middle- and high-school drama classes, but programs like the FAC’s enable them to pursue theater as a serious career path, with an earlier start than many of their peers. To continue growing the program’s impact, the FAC will host a fundraising concert featuring past and current Ensemble students performing music from A New Brain. This 1998 musical (by the authors of Falsettos, which was revived on Broadway in 2016) is loosely based on composer William Finn’s experiences with a brain malformation and how he found emotional healing through his art. Enjoy the musical’s delightful and poignant soundtrack performed by some talented young people and pros, all the while keeping in mind that your ticket will help fund some kid’s dreams of stardom. Bonus: Attendees are invited to a talkback with Dr. Chamisa MacIndoe, UCHealth neurointensivist, and the cast and creative team right after the show.
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Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Carol Dickerson has improvised her way through a creative slump

Posted By on Wed, Jan 9, 2019 at 1:00 AM

Carol Dickerson: Studio Journey, Opening reception, Jan. 11, 5:30-8 p.m.; on display through Feb. 16, G44 Gallery, 1785 S. Eighth St., Suite A, g44gallery.com. - CAROL DICKERSON
  • Carol Dickerson
  • Carol Dickerson: Studio Journey, Opening reception, Jan. 11, 5:30-8 p.m.; on display through Feb. 16, G44 Gallery, 1785 S. Eighth St., Suite A, g44gallery.com.
Every artist hits those slumps where their creativity stops flowing, or stops flowing as freely, and a new tactic becomes necessary to kick-start a new phase. When Carol Dickerson hit that wall last year, she turned to the guidance and expertise of California artist Nancy Hillis, who happened to be teaching a year-long online course that provided exercises, demonstrations and chat forums for students to seek feedback on their work. “It turned into an extraordinary community of artists whose work both inspired and motivated me,” says Dickerson in her artist statement. “... When I got stuck in my own work, I could tackle some of the course exercises such as exploring rhythm, working with constraints, or working with a secondary palette, and this helped me see my own work in a fresh way.” This studio journey on which she embarked with her fellow students formed the body of work for her new show, opening at G44 Gallery this Friday. Layering acrylic paint with occasional other materials like crayon or charcoal, Dickerson says her process “is similar to jazz improvisation: Each move is a response to the color, line, rhythm, texture and shapes of the previous layer.”
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Monday, January 7, 2019

Colorado Poet Laureate nominations open through Feb. 1

Posted By on Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 2:38 PM

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
  • Shutterstock.com
In 1919, Colorado’s then-Governor Oliver Shoup appointed Alice Polk Hill to the position of Colorado Poet Laureate. With that appointment, Colorado became one of the first states to honor poets with such a title. Five other people have served in the position since, including current Colorado Poet Laureate Joseph Hutchison. Now, Colorado Humanities & Center for the Book and Colorado Creative Industries hope to find the next person to fill these big shoes.

Nominations are officially open for the next Poet Laureate of Colorado. From the organizations’ press release:

The Poet Laureate serves as an active advocate for poetry, literacy, and literature by participating in readings and other events at schools, libraries, literary festivals, and the State Capitol. The Poet Laureate will also provide the Governor with an annual account of the impact and success of the Colorado Poet Laureate program.

The selection of Poet Laureate will be based on artistic excellence, a demonstrated history of community service in the advancement of poetry, and the ability to present poetry effectively. A review panel will be convened to review nominations and make recommendations to the Governor, who will make the final selection. Complete nominations will be accepted through February 1, 2019. The Poet Laureate chosen by the Governor will serve a four-year term beginning in July 2019.

And, because any hopeful poet may be encouraged by this information, the Poet Laureate will receive $2,000 honoraria annually, plus up to $2,000 in travel expenses annually.

Any individual or organization may nominate a poet (and poets may nominate themselves), but nominations must be submitted online by no later than Feb. 1, 2019.
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