Tuesday, September 17, 2019

City Council approves tiny home village for at-risk young people

Posted By on Tue, Sep 17, 2019 at 11:11 AM

click to enlarge A tiny home development will go forward in the Mill Street neighborhood. - COURTESY OF WE FORTIFY
  • Courtesy of We Fortify
  • A tiny home development will go forward in the Mill Street neighborhood.

A tiny home village for at-risk young people in the Mill Street neighborhood will be Colorado Springs' first such development, thanks to City Council's unanimous approval of the project Sept. 10.

(Other than tuberculosis huts in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the city's never had a tiny home development, according to the project consultant.)

The development, dubbed Working Fusion at Mill Street, replaces five 19th-century homes on Fountain Boulevard between Sierra Madre and Sahwatch streets with 18 tiny homes, each about 240 square feet.

They'll will be rented, for $600 a month, to young people between the ages of 18 and 29 working toward independence — those who have a steady job and don’t use drugs, but may need an extra hand after leaving the foster care system, exiting military service, or encountering life difficulties that could put them at risk of becoming homeless.

While Councilor David Geislinger ultimately supported the project, he initially voiced concern that the price tag could be steep for a low-income renter.

Going by the formula that 30 percent of one's income should go to rent, he pointed out, "that's a yearly take-home of $24,000, or about $12 an hour. ...I guess the question I have is, what is the population that you're trying to bring into this? And is it a population that realistically we can expect to have take-home pay of $24,000 a year?"

(Of note: A former resident of one of the 19th-century homes on the future project site told the Indy in August she was paying $500 a month for rent, less than the at-risk young people will pay. Colorado has a minimum wage of $11.10, which will bump up to $12 in 2020.)

Project founder Shelley Jensen said she expects residents to be financially challenged, and that an emergency fund will help provide a cushion if they can't make a rent payment. Wraparound services tailored to each person, which could include budgeting classes, career counseling and anger management, will be offered to the residents through the nonprofit running the village, We Fortify.

Joanne Zeigler spoke on behalf of the Mill Street Neighborhood Association, which opposes the project. She argued that the neighborhood was already overwhelmed by clients using Springs Rescue Mission and the Salvation Army Shelter & Services at RJ Montgomery.

"Ever since we've started public hearings, we've described that these people who are going to be the residents are not going to be homeless," Jensen argued. "And I get it, that it's hard to believe that, because there is so much transient activity down there." She told Council that she had expressed a willingness to work with the neighborhood on a "good neighbor contract," but hadn't received a response.

Ultimately, City Council voted 8-0 in favor of the project, with Councilor Wayne Williams absent.

"I really appreciate this project and all the work you've put into it," Council President Richard Skorman told Jensen before the vote, calling it "a good example of what we can do in the future."

The property is owned by the Flaks Family Trust, which planned to demolish the old houses whether or not the project secured approval. Developer Kairos Project 17 has a 10-year lease.

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