Friday, September 20, 2019

Climate Strike draws hundreds to City Hall

Posted By on Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 6:03 PM

click to enlarge Activists unrolled a banner in front of City Hall. - FAITH MILLER
  • Faith Miller
  • Activists unrolled a banner in front of City Hall.

Holding signs bearing slogans such as "End environmental racism," "Believe in science," and "Don't be a fossil fool," around 300 activists of all ages rallied on the steps of City Hall — and later marched around downtown — to demand action on climate change.

The Sept. 20 "Climate Strike" was part of a global movement, planned three days ahead of the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York — a meeting of leaders around the world who hope to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 45 percent over the next decade.

click to enlarge Hundreds of people gathered to kick off Climate Action Week. - FAITH MILLER
  • Faith Miller
  • Hundreds of people gathered to kick off Climate Action Week.

Environmental nonprofit 350 Colorado publicized the event and helped coordinate strikes across the state.

In Colorado Springs, the strike included students from Palmer High School, the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and Colorado College, along with members of the NAACP - Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak Group of the Sierra Club. City Council President Richard Skorman was among those in attendance.

click to enlarge Two people hold a sign reading "Time 2 act like your house is on fire. Because it is." - FAITH MILLER
  • Faith Miller
  • Two people hold a sign reading "Time 2 act like your house is on fire. Because it is."

The impetus for a Global Climate Strike came from 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg (of sailing fame) and 45 other young people who called for students to walk out of school Sept. 20 and make their voices heard. They asked adults to leave work and join in, too.

Other strikes were planned in Denver outside the state Capitol, at Colorado School of Mines in Golden and at Pueblo's Rawlings Library, to name a few in Colorado. They're meant to kick off a worldwide Climate Action Week Sept. 21 to 29.

click to enlarge A high-energy crowd brandished signs and chanted. - FAITH MILLER
  • Faith Miller
  • A high-energy crowd brandished signs and chanted.

Colorado's Action Week events are centered in the state's Capitol. They include a weeklong art installation on Denver's 16th Street Mall, protests in downtown Denver during rush hour Sept. 23, and a community garden-building event Sept. 29.

“Climate Change and pollution affects us, the citizens of Colorado Springs, whether we like it or not," said Palmer High School organizer Taylor Saulsbury, who was quoted in a statement from 350 Colorado. "...We are standing up for a future stolen from us whether our teachers or our government like it or not.”

click to enlarge Teen activist Emma Tang joined the rally. - FAITH MILLER
  • Faith Miller
  • Teen activist Emma Tang joined the rally.
At one point, Colorado Springs protesters chanted about closing the coal-fired Martin Drake Power Plant, a central issue for local environmental activists. The plant is scheduled to be decommissioned no later than 2035.

However, activists have repeatedly demanded that Colorado Springs Utilities close the plant (along with the Ray Nixon Power Plant in Fountain) as soon as possible.

A recent study by Strategen found that the Drake coal-fired units, which came online in 1968 and 1974, would cost $42.5 million more over 30 years to run compared to wind and solar.

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