COSAnonymous1 
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Re: “Mike Angley challenges Elder in sheriff's office race

***CSINDY AND MIKE ANGLEY, HISTORY ON LAS VEGAS METRO; ITS INCORPORATION WAS TO RESOLVE THE SAME ISSUES BOTH EPC AND CSPD HAVE BEEN FACING FOR MANY YEARS. MIKE, IF YOUR GOAL IS TO MAKE THINGS BETTER AND NOT SIMPLY TO ATTAIN POLITICAL CLOUT, THIS ON THE SURFACE SEEMS LIKE A VIABLE SOLUTION TO OUR LOCAL FUNDING AND MANPOWER PROBLEMS***

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) was formed on July 1, 1973, by merging the Las Vegas Police Department with the Clark County Sheriff's Department. Metro serves the city limits of Las Vegas and the unincorporated areas of Clark County.

In the early 1970s, both the Las Vegas Police Department and the Clark County Sheriff's Department struggled with jurisdictional and budgetary problems. Oftentimes, people living in the metropolitan area would call the wrong agency to report crimes in progress, which would delay police response. Both agencies were also strapped for manpower, yet used a lot of it duplicating record-keeping and administrative functions in both of the agencies. The idea of consolidating the two law enforcement agencies into one metropolitan department began to circulate among the top officials in both agencies, likely due to the close working relationship between the Clark County Sheriff and the Las Vegas Police Chief at that time. It was said that even police officers on the Las Vegas Police Department could see that it would be better if the agency were run by the Sheriff, due to the fact that he was an elected official. Legislation to merge the Las Vegas Police Department with the Clark County Sheriff's Department was passed by the Nevada State Legislature, and the merger became effective in 1973.[2]

In 1999, an outside audit, commissioned by the City of Las Vegas and conducted by DMG-Maximus, commended the department for having fewer managers and supervisors than are typically found in large police agencies. The audit also said that the managers, both sworn and civilian, were of "excellent quality."[3] The auditors found that the recruitment and selection program was "among the best we have encountered in recent years." Although the city had planned to commission a second phase of the study, DMG-Maximus auditors said they were so impressed with the department that further study was unnecessary, saving the city $180,000 that had been allocated for the audit.[3]

On January 5, 2015, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department officially assumed responsibility for the Las Vegas Township Constable's Office.[4] Las Vegas Township Constable's Office continues to be a separate entity but under Metro's detention services division.[5]

Metro has more than 5,100 members. Of these, over 2,700 are police officers of various ranks and over 750 are corrections officers of various ranks.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by COSAnonymous1 on 09/16/2017 at 2:18 AM

Re: “Mike Angley challenges Elder in sheriff's office race

Citizens of El Paso County from a concerned deputy:

1. Although Maketa is gone, almost ALL of his command staff is still at the EPSO. Joe Breister, Brad Shannon, etc. Yes, Elder paid political debts with jobs (Janet Huffor, Bill Huffor, others). Think about it, Janet's only LE experience was as a detentions deputy, which isn't really LE at all but corrections. And all of a sudden she is eligible to serve in a Chief of Staff position? Hardly. Someone who has never worked the street is in a position to potentially directly advise Elder on all things related to patrolling the county? Give me a break. This, and so many other personnel decisions he has made (the rapid ascent of Bill Huffor through the ranks and his protection from policy violations), should give you pause in giving him your vote next time. Although he is not Maketa, he is engaging in very similar behavior. It is TIME for fresh blood at ALL areas of leadership at EPSO.

2. Your streets are grossly unpatrolled. Typically only 8-10 deputies patrol the largest county in the state, both in area and population (roughly 175,000 people who don't live in the Springs, Fountain, Manitou, and Monument, who all have their own PDs). These are 1990-type numbers. The incident last week at the King Soopers with the suicidal man took most of our on duty resources...for one call! Even with 1A, the numbers are low. What this means to you is proactive patrolling (the kind of policing that has proven to prevent crime long term, not reactive patrolling) does not occur. Sure, we need 1A to pass again, but it in and of itself it is not adequate; something has to give. Long term, significant funding increases need to happen from the BoCC. This is not Hazard county with Roscoe P. Coltrain chasing the Duke brothers around, and the funding and staffing levels should not look the same either.

I am a taxpayer and homeowner and am your peer in being a citizen of EPC. No one wants to pay more taxes. However, I am also an EPSO deputy. We are underfunded and understaffed, and significantly so. We NEED a significant increase in staffing, and we need a command staff and Sheriff who will create an environment where people will want to stay. Please help us out and give Elder the boot. Mr. Angley talks like the guy who could do this.

CSINDY, just thinking out loud here, you report for a metro community of roughly 700,000 people who live in several landlocked cities and towns, and surrounding all of this is dense urban unincorporated areas (Security/Widefield, west-side of Colorado Springs, Cimarron Hills, Falcon, etc.). You have reach. There are 5 LE agencies here who all work around and with each other due to proximity on a daily basis. Maybe, just maybe, it's time we as a community start to look at consolidating LE services into one metro agency like Las Vegas has done, for instance. Although each municipality will not initially be for this, in my opinion, some serious reporting and study should be done to determine if such a consolidation of resources would make financial sense for the taxpayer. It will create more funding due to pooling the resources, less overhead overall, and a consolidated law enforcement focus on crime in our area. If the numbers show that it would work, then public pressure could be placed on our political leaders to enact this sort of thing (they would never do it on their own as it would impact their power). This proposed metro agency would still run the jail (just like Vegas Metro does). Just a thought, might be worth studying and reporting on, maybe even teaming with The Gazette or a news station.

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by COSAnonymous1 on 09/16/2017 at 2:07 AM

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