February 18, 2018 Slideshows » Columns

Documenting climate change and the lives of women 

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Joanna Pinneo
A woman fries fish in a market in Navrongo, Ghana, over a smokey fire. She often cooks here all day long, breathing in the smoke.
Joanna Pinneo
Fatma Mziray collects firewood for cooking near Fatma’s home in Mforo near Moshi, Tanzania. Mziray is a Solar Sister entrepreneur who sells both clean cookstoves and solar lanterns. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. The smoke from cooking on her traditional wood stove was causing her to have a lot of heath problems — lung congestion and stinging eyes. Her doctor told her that she had to stop cooking that way.
Joanna Pinneo
Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, (yellow and red patterned skirt), her mother Fatma Mziray, age 38, (blue head dress), and Fatma’s sister-in-law Zaitun Hamad, 18, (orange wrap and white top) walk home after gathering firewood near Fatma’s home in Mforo. Mforo is near Moshi, Tanzania.
Joanna Pinneo
Shadya Jumanne, 11, helps with the family cooking using a traditional cookstove in Mforo, near Moshi, Tanzania. These cookstoves use a lot of fuel, firewood, and produce a lot of smoke.
Joanna Pinneo
Kachana Kojo of Tanzania cuts onions to make a stew for dinner. She cooks a lot on three stones, particularly when she needs to make a big pot of a local staple called Tuo Zaafi, traditionally made with millet or maize.
Joanna Pinneo
Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray shows Zainabu Jabiri how to use a clean wood cookstove. When Fatma was showing the clean cookstove to women in her village near Arusha, Tanzania, Jabiri decided to get one. She loved the idea that it used a lot less firewood, that it is compact and also nice looking. She sold firewood and charcoal to save money to be able to purchase the stove.
Joanna Pinneo
At her home near Arusha, Tanzania, Solar Sister entrepreneur Julieth Mollel prepares a dinner of ugali, vegetables and beans on her clean cookstove. Ugali, a cornmeal porridge, is a staple eaten in many countries in Africa. Working in her compact outdoor kitchen at night is easier now with the clean cookstove that puts out very little smoke and uses only a fraction of the firewood of a traditional three-stone cookstove.
Joanna Pinneo
Ester Hodari cooks dinner using the traditional three-rock cook stove with a fire in the middle in Mforo, a village near Moshi, Tanzania. These cookstoves use a lot of fuel, firewood, and produce a lot of smoke. Ester told us that cooking with this type of stove made her eyes turn red and she often had a chest cough.
Joanna Pinneo
Dr. Bonnie Young, right, with her assistant takes measurements to install a device that monitors smoke above a clean cookstove in rural Honduras as part of a study by Colorado State University. The study sought to understand the connection between household air pollution and changes in women’s health over time based on the kinds of stoves they used, biomass fuel specifically.
Joanna Pinneo
Dolores, a Honduran woman, wears a monitor that measures the smoke emissions from her traditional stove as part of a study by Colorado State University.
Joanna Pinneo
Honduran Juliana de Paz has been cooking since she was seven years old. “When I first started cooking, I cooked over rocks in the ground. I started using this type of traditional stove when I was fifteen.” She currently suffers from coughs, headaches and flu-like symptoms.
Joanna Pinneo
A common issue with adapting to clean cooking is "stove stacking." Women like to cook with more than one stove and sometimes will add the new, cleaner stove to use with a traditional stove. This woman is using an Envirofit stove that the Honduran government provided.
Joanna Pinneo
Desmond, a resercher in Navrongo Heath Reseach Center in Ghana, sets up an emissions monitor to measure smoke from a cooking fire. The effort is a collaboration with researchers at CU Boulder.
Joanna Pinneo
Filter taken from a 24-hour sample sensor after cooking with a traditional stove.
Joanna Pinneo
Ramatu, a Ghanaian woman, cooks on a coal pot stove. In the background is an LPG stove. The family is not using the LPG stove at the moment because they cannot afford to replace the gas canister.
Joanna Pinneo
Zainab Abubakari prepares a big pot of “Shito” (Shee-to) for her daughter to take to school. Shito is a tomato sauce with garlic and pepper, dried fish, and a Ghanaian pepper sauce. She has an LPG stove but cannot afford to replace the gas canister right now.
Joanna Pinneo
At her home near Arusha, Tanzania, Solar Sister entrepreneur Julieth Mollel prepares dinner in her courtyard on both her clean wood cookstove and charcoal cookstove she bought from Solar Sister. Cooking at night is easier now with the clean cookstoves that puts out very little smoke and uses only a fraction of the firewood or coal of a traditional cookstove, but also with her Solar Sister solar lantern to light the area. Julieth’s personal world is brighter because, as a Solar Sister entrepreneur, she earns enough money to send her grandchildren to school.
Joanna Pinneo
Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray and her eldest daughter Zainabu Ramadhani, 19, cook lunch in her kitchen house using both a clean cookstove, and one using coal. Fatma heard about the cookstoves from a Solar Sister development associate and decided to try one out. “Cooking for a family, preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner I used to gather a large load of wood every day to use. Now with the new cook stove the same load of wood can last up to three weeks of cooking," she explained.
Joanna Pinneo
Kachana Kojo and her children outside her home in Tanzania.
Joanna Pinneo
Lamisi Didera, 20, and her sister Jessica, 15, prepare dinner on their LPG stove in the village of Navrongo, Ghana. Lamisi purchased the LPG stove for her mother because her mother told her she was not feeling well and complained when she was cooking. Lamisi thought the smoke was bothering her, so she bought her the stove about three years ago. Jessica loves to use the LPG stove and thinks the wood and coal is too much trouble.
Joanna Pinneo
Solar Sister entrepreneur Fatma Mziray delivers a clean wood cookstove to Zainabu Jabiri.
Joanna Pinneo
Photographer Joanna Pinneo, center, with Solar Sister entrepreneurs Grace Mbwambo, left, and Grace Kimaro, right, in Mforo, Tanzania.
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Joanna Pinneo
A woman fries fish in a market in Navrongo, Ghana, over a smokey fire. She often cooks here all day long, breathing in the smoke.
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