September 08, 2017 Slideshows » Columns

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Hawk release a result of Raptor Center, volunteer efforts 

On September 3rd, two Red-tailed hawks that had been found orphaned and malnourished were returned to the wild at Cheyenne Mountain State Park. The two hawks, one found on Ft. Carson, the other near Sky Sox Stadium in Colorado Springs, were rehabilitated at the Nature and Raptor Center in Pueblo, and joined other rehabilitated raptors in an educational presentation before the hawks' release.
Bob Falcone
Nature and Raptor Center's Diana Miller and a rescued, one-eyed Big Horned owl at Cheyenne Mountain State Park. Although it can fly, it's not able to be released into the wild because due to the injury.
Bob Falcone
Even with just one eye, the owl didn't seem to miss anything going on around him.
Bob Falcone
Diana Miller holds a Red Tail hawk that was rehabilitated after suffering a broken wing. Unable to fly, it is used by the Nature and Raptor Center for public education events. Two other Red Tail hawks were released at the park after the presentation.
Bob Falcone
This Peregrine Falcon was also found with a broken wing. The wing was repaired, but it is unable to fly and is used for presentations such as this one.
Bob Falcone
As part of the presentation, a raffle was held with two winners being chosen to release the rehabilitated raptors. Here, Miller is giving the first winner a female Red Tail hawk to release. According to Miller, one of three things would occur: the raptor would land in a tree nearby and survey it's new surroundings for hours or even days, or it would fly off, looking for food, or possibly panic and fly back at the person releasing it.
Bob Falcone
After release, thiis hawk landed on a tree a few hundred feet away and was still there when everyone left a while later.
Bob Falcone
The second hawk, a male, ready to be released by another raffle winner.
Bob Falcone
The second hawk flew off into the distance, presumably looking for its next meal.
Bob Falcone
The first hawk that was released, perched nearby.
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Bob Falcone
Nature and Raptor Center's Diana Miller and a rescued, one-eyed Big Horned owl at Cheyenne Mountain State Park. Although it can fly, it's not able to be released into the wild because due to the injury.
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