Favorite

Movie Picks 

click to enlarge Lanie?s life is just perfect ? until Prophet Jack gives her the bad news.
  • Lanie?s life is just perfect ? until Prophet Jack gives her the bad news.

*A Beautiful Mind (PG-13)
Winner of Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Adapted Screenplay at the 74th Annual Academy Awards. Need we say more?

Chapel Hills

Changing Lanes (R)
Changing Lanes isn't a masterpiece of filmmaking -- and its answers come a little bit too easily -- but for a product of the Hollywood studio system, it does a much better job than most at showing the moral ambiguity and complexity possible in one crazy, messed up, very bad day. Both Ben Affleck and Samuel L Jackson are strong in the film and a compelling supporting cast backs them. -- Andrea Lucard

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Clockstoppers (PG)
Special effectsladen teen-age adventure romp where time stands still. -- Not reviewed

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Frailty (R)
You got your sleepy little Texas town, Thurman, where the motherless Meeks family lives in seclusion behind the public rose garden. You got your tough Texas law man. And you got your ax murderer. Basically you got your classic Texas gothic horror tale, acted and directed, yep, by a bunch of Texans. Everyman Texan Bill Paxton directs here and plays the widower Meeks, a loving daddy to his two little boys. Now Paxton knows Texas and small towns and rain and fog and little boys and creepy, dark rose gardens and he gives us plenty of atmosphere, lots and lots of creepy atmosphere. But his movie loses its way when Daddy starts chopping heads. Frailty is moody as a preacher's wife and scary as all get out. But when it tries to outsmart us in the end, it just gets us all confused. I like a good murder mystery as much as the next 'un, but ol' Bill Paxton and Frailty -- well, Hitchcock they ain't. Let's just say Frailty'll scare the pants off of you, then leave you with no place to hide. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

High Crimes (PG-13)
While Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd repeat their successful screen chemistry after Kiss the Girls (1997), the narrative twist that concludes High Crimes comes as a reprehensibly cheap device that perverts the film's scathing commentary on the U.S. military and its terribly flawed military court system. I've never seen anything like it in the more than 4,000 movies I've seen -- and I hope I never see it again. -- Cole Smithey

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Hometown Legend (PG)
A teenage drifter finds an opportunity to turn his life around when he joins a high-school football program with a hard-nosed coach. -- Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills

*Ice Age (PG)
Ice Age triumphs by eschewing the inside adult humor that infiltrates so many other animated children's movies. Where movies like Shrek attempt to cater to adult audiences with not-so-subtle sexual innuendo and overloaded pop-culture cross-referencing, Ice Age stays the course of its genre's Bugs Bunny slapstick humor. -- Cole Smithey

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Joshua (G)
A stranger named Joshua arrives in a small town, gets a job working as a carpenter, and proceeds to perform acts that appear to be miracles, leading many of the locals to suspect that he may be the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. -- Not reviewed

Cinemark 16

*Lantana (R)
This Australian film directed by Ray Lawrence is not a thriller, in spite of its central mystery -- the discovery of the dead body of an unidentified woman. It's a psychological drama about adult relationships, loyalty, grief, infidelity, disillusionment, existential crisis and, of course, love. Lantana shows us people as they really live -- on the surface, going through the motions, their sorrow deeply buried. Lantana is an accomplished adult film with people of substance at its core -- a rarity in current cinema. Highly recommended. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Kimball's Twin Peak Theater

*Lord of the Rings (PG-13)
Let the fanatics hash out the discrepancies with the book in their chat rooms. Director Peter Jackson did it. This film is cool. Very cool. -- Noel Black

Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Monster's Ball (R)
Risking every Deep South, Faulknerian stereotype about racism, rednecks, skeletons in the closet and man's inhumanity to man, it's a miracle that Monster's Ball turns out to be such an intriguing film. Chalk it up to two things: 1) a Swedish director (Marc Forster) who is able to explore Southern stereotypes as a cool observer, and 2) the astonishing acting duo of Billy Bob Thornton and Halle Berry, winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress for this role. Monster's Ball may fumble in the first half, but overall, it's a raw, emotional triumph. -- Kathryn Eastburn

Tinseltown

Murder by Numbers (R)
Two gifted high-school students commit a series of "perfect murders" and engage in a battle of wits with the detective who's hot on their trail. Starring Sandra Bullock, Ryan Gosling and Michael Pitt. -- Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

National Lampoon's Van Wilder (R)
Ryan Reynolds (of ABC's Two Guys and a Girl) stars as Van Wilder, a college senior who's been milking the cush college life for seven years. When he learns that his father will not pay for another semester, he's got to figure out how to pay for it all now. Also starring Tara Reid and Tim Matheson. -- Not reviewed

Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

The Other Side of Heaven (PG)
The story of a Mormon missionary's three years in the South Sea islands, resisting temptation so that he can return to his beloved pure and chaste. -- Not reviewed

Cinemark 16

Panic Room (R)
In the end, Panic Room seems to be more of a failed film-school exercise in pure plot than a look at fear, our need for security, our national obsession with surveillance, class differences, and a host of other things it could've been. -- Noel Black

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Penny Promise (G)
A family comedy about Will, who through a series of mishaps gets deeper in debt as he tries to save money to marry his sweetheart, Annie. -- Not reviewed

Chapel Hills

The Rookie (G)
Based on the true story of high-school science teacher and baseball coach Jim Morris, who joins the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at the age of 35 after making a deal with his high school team: If they make the playoffs, he'll try out for the major league. Starring Dennis Quaid and Rachel Griffiths. -- Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

The Scorpion King (PG-13)
Action/horror film about a peasant in ancient Egypt who exacts revenge on a marauding army who pillaged his village ... and eventually becomes known as the Scorpion King, the First Pharoah of Egypt. -- Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

The Sweetest Thing (R)
Female sex comedy starring Cameron Diaz with Christina Applegate, Selma Blair and Parker Posey. Diaz is Christine, tracking down Mr. Right. -- Not reviewed

Chapel Hills, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

All content © Copyright 2017, The Colorado Springs Independent

Website powered by Foundation