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Alice in Wonderland (PG)

In Tim Burton's disappointing take on Lewis Carroll's classics, it's nice to meet young actress Mia Wasikowska as an independent-minded teen Alice; less nice that the adventure involves donning armor, beheading a dragon, and drinking its blood. — Jonathan Kiefer

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Avatar (PG-13)

Avatar is set in a computer-generated world called Pandora, a planet inhabited by the Na'vi, who are rich in a coveted resource ridiculously named Unobtainium. — Tricia Olszewski

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*Babies (PG)

This documentary follows four babies on four different continents through their first year of life. Say what you will about the film, but you can't accuse it of false advertising. — Jonathan Kiefer

Kimball's Peak Three

The Back-up Plan (PG-13)

A single woman (Jennifer Lopez) who has given up on getting married, finally meets a man she thinks might be "the one" on the day of her artificial insemination. — Not reviewed

Chapel Hills 15

The Book of Eli (R)

Walker (Denzel Washington) wanders through a post-apocalyptic world holding the last known copy of the King James Bible. All he knows is that he's headed west and must keep the book safe. — Jonathan Kiefer

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Clash of the Titans (PG-13)

Perseus and Co.'s battles — which include giant scorpions, a cursed king, a squadron of flying harpies, and the snake-haired Medusa — are all edited together with frantic inefficiency. The result is a movie that moves without creating any real tension. — Scott Renshaw

Tinseltown

The Crazies (R)

Loosely based on the George Romero horror classic, this remake takes place in a small Iowa town where a toxin is turning people into psychopaths. — Not reviewed

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*Date Night (PG-13)

Steve Carell and Tina Fey add flavor to what otherwise might have been a bland comedy, as they play a couple trying to invigorate their marriage with a date night when mobsters mistake them for another couple. — Scott Renshaw

Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Diary of a Wimpy Kid (PG)

The things Jeff Kinney's cartoon-novel stick figures get away with in the books that inspired this film, suddenly seem heartless and cruel once actual flesh-and-blood kids do them. Isn't middle school bad enough already? — MaryAnn Johanson

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From Paris With Love (R)

An intelligence operative working in France takes on more than he bargained for when he partners with a U.S. agent sent to Paris to stop a terrorist attack. — Not reviewed

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Furry Vengeance (PG)

When a real estate developer's latest project threatens the local forest creatures, the animals seek revenge by turning a peaceful cul-de-sac under construction into a battlefield. — Not reviewed

Chapel Hills 15, Tinseltown

*The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (NR)

Based on the novel by Scandinavian author Stieg Larsson, the film won Sweden's Oscar-equivalent for Best Picture. Noomi Rapace is unforgettable as Lisbeth, a 24-year-old Goth punk who's angry, antisocial and readily violent — also a brilliant hacker for a security company. — Tricia Olszewski

Kimball's Peak Three

*How to Train Your Dragon (PG)

How to Train Your Dragon opts for the most overused premise in kid-flick-dom, that of a misfit whose unique gifts are destined to be valued by those who once mocked him. But, the film's flying sequences make the ticket price seem worthwhile. — Scott Renshaw

Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

*Iron Man 2 (PG-13)

With its wily script by Justin Theroux, Favreau's film is hearty and swiftly paced, but not helped by having so many characters. Favreau and Co. have a knack for meeting superhero blockbuster expectations. — Jonathan Kiefer

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Cinemark 16 IMAX, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Just Wright (PG)

Queen Latifah plays Leslie Wright, a physical therapist who falls for NBA star Scott McKnight, played by rapper Common. There is a great cinematic tradition of male and female leads in romantic comedies trading barbs. But not in this film. — Justin Strout

Carmike 10, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Letters to Juliet (PG)

When a young American travels to Italy, home of the star-crossed lover Juliet of Romeo and Juliet fame, she joins a group of volunteers who answer letters to Juliet seeking advice about love. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

The Losers (PG-13)

Members of a U.S. Special Forces team find themselves on a mission in the Bolivian jungle hunting down an enemy after a failed assassination attempt. — Not reviewed

Tinseltown

A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010) (R)

In this remake, a group of teenagers share one common bond: they are all being stalked by Freddy Krueger, who hunts them in their dreams. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief (PG)

Based on the book by Rick Riordan, a teen learns that he's descended from the mythological figure Poseidon. — Not reviewed

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Robin Hood (PG-13)

Robin Hood was supposed to be awesome. Did not Russell Crowe and Ridley Scott implicitly promise me awesome with their Gladiator-in-Sherwood-Forest trailer? But that ain't what we get. — MaryAnn Johnson

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Kimball's Peak Three, Tinseltown

*Shutter Island (R)

Director Martin Scorsese seems to enjoy this suspense thriller as Gothic horror noir throwback. And, it lets him prove the reasons for his faith in Leonardo DiCaprio, who delivers as a U.S. Marshal pursuing a prison escapee. — Jonathan Kiefer

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The Spy Next Door (PG)

Jackie Chan plays a super spy who decides to give up espionage to settle down with his girlfriend, but first he must complete his most difficult mission — to win over her kids. — Not reviewed

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Tooth Fairy (PG)

When a hockey player (Dwayne Johnson) crushes a girl's belief in the tooth fairy, he must spend a week performing the fairy's duties. — Not reviewed

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Valentine's Day (PG-13)

Valentine's Day covers approximately 20 main characters and 10 significant romantic angles in 120 minutes. Do the math, and what can each subplot possibly deliver besides a cutesy intro, perfunctory conflict, and shallow happily-ever-after? — Scott Renshaw

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