Phillip Cargile 
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Re: “UPDATE: Wagon Man headed back to court, draws support

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Positive Day Precious Friends...Back to Class.....our subject ties in with the injustices we are dealing with...love and hugs.....see you in the streets.....

Week 5 D 1
Incarceration
The United States has the highest reported incarceration rate in the world. While the U.S. currently incarcerates 750 inmates per 100,000 persons, the world average rate is 166 per 100,000 persons. Russia, the country with the second-highest incarceration rate, imprisons 624 inmates per 100,000 persons. Compared to its democratic, advanced market economy counterparts, the U.S. has more people in prison by several orders of magnitude. Although crime rates have decreased since 1990, the rate of imprisonment has continued to increase.
Please discuss the economic and social implications of this public policy.
The first economic and social implication that this scholar would like to bring into light is the fact that when costs are mentioned where housing prisoners are concerned; they are not correct. Our topic for this week’s discussion points out, that the United States has the highest prison population in the entire world. Cost to house one prisoner typically has been reported to be around $20,000 annually (Austin & Coventry). This is not quite true. There are other costs to housing an inmate that are never discussed (2001). Other related costs are the inmate’s family left outside the prison gates.
The truth is that the while the state pays the private prisons to house, feed, clothe, and provide medical needs for the inmate; the state also pays for the cost of housing, feeding, clothing, and taking care of the inmate’s family (Austin & Coventry). The truth is that the cost burdened upon the state and paid by every taxpayer is between $ 40,000 to $60,000 annually to house one inmate and provide care for his/her family that has been left outside the prison walls (2001).
Another societal problem caused by over use of imprisonment is the decrease in voter population. A country cannot truly be a democratic country that provide the best for its citizens when the country has the highest incarceration in the world. This country bears shame. The shame is on the leaders who continue to allow their constituents to be treated inhumanely due to being less fortunate, whether mentally, physically, or economically. This country truly needs caring and positive leadership.
Conceding that not all prisoners can be helped this scholar understands that negative exists in human behaviors. Those humans who chose to commit violent crimes should be locked away from a caring society. The humans who make nonviolent human mistakes deserve humane treatment (Mitchell). Programs that help inmates learn a trade such as cooking or mechanics are a start (Mitchell). However the prison system needs to remember that not all inmates have the same talents. Some inmates have talents that have never been utilized to benefit all (2014).
The economic and social implications are witnessed every day throughout America’s communities. The prison population continues to increase, fewer citizens can register to vote, and the applications for government assistance increases. Implications for this overuse of the prison system problem has become the United States citizens’ nightmare called reality.
References
Austin, James and Coventry, Gary (February, 2001). Emerging Issues on Privatized Prisons. Retrieved from: Emerging Issues on Privatized Prisons – National Criminal ...www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/bja/181249.pdf
Mitchell, Michael and Leachman, Michael (October 28, 2014). Changing Priorities:State Criminal Justice Reforms and Investments in Education. Retrieved from: www.prisonpolicy.org/research/prison_and_the_economy

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Posted by Phillip Cargile on 06/11/2015 at 8:20 PM

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