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Sons and Daughters  -  - The Repulsion Box  - Domino Sons and Daughters' last EP, Love - the Cup, played like a justifiably dark homage to - Johnny Cash, even featuring a song named for him. Their - latest, Repulsion Box, continues that trend, - neither lightening up nor hopping on the fancypants - bandwagon like fellow Glaswegians, Franz Ferdinand. - The coed quartet's sound always has been a mix of - dangerous Americana and Scottish rhythms, and - producer Victor Van Vugt (Nick Cave, PJ Harvey) knows - how to tap it. "Dance Me In" best displays that American/ - Scottish concoction, while "Medicine" thumps along with - sexy abandon. Singer/guitarist Adele Bethel's thick - Sco'ish accent purrs and pleases, while the band runs - everything heartbeat-quick. "Red Receiver" sounds like - an unlikely duet between The Clash and The Animals, - but for all the comparisons, S&D are entirely their own. - -- Kara Luger
  • Sons and Daughters

    The Repulsion Box
    Domino

    Sons and Daughters' last EP, Love the Cup, played like a justifiably dark homage to Johnny Cash, even featuring a song named for him. Their latest, Repulsion Box, continues that trend, neither lightening up nor hopping on the fancypants bandwagon like fellow Glaswegians, Franz Ferdinand. The coed quartet's sound always has been a mix of dangerous Americana and Scottish rhythms, and producer Victor Van Vugt (Nick Cave, PJ Harvey) knows how to tap it. "Dance Me In" best displays that American/ Scottish concoction, while "Medicine" thumps along with sexy abandon. Singer/guitarist Adele Bethel's thick Sco'ish accent purrs and pleases, while the band runs everything heartbeat-quick. "Red Receiver" sounds like an unlikely duet between The Clash and The Animals, but for all the comparisons, S&D are entirely their own. -- Kara Luger

Animal Collective  -  - Feels  - Fat Cat New York's Animal Collective doesn't - tour with the songs they've already put to disc; instead, - they use their shows to experiment with ideas and - musical sketches for upcoming projects. The results are - oddly listenable, though sometimes uneven, records that - are refined in their strangeness. Feels is far and - away the best and most unbroken illustration of this - technique in Animal Collective's otherwise intermittently - brilliant repertoire. For a record that places giddy, - bizarre pop beside long, contemplative stretches, - Feels goes down smoothly. Gone are the - spaced-out, entirely too soporific 12-minute works that - brought previous albums to a dead halt. The longest - track here, "Banshee Beat," clocks in at around eight - minutes and propels you through Feels' quieter, - delicate second half with its surprising use of a clear, - blatant melody. -- Eric Phillips
  • Animal Collective

    Feels
    Fat Cat

    New York's Animal Collective doesn't tour with the songs they've already put to disc; instead, they use their shows to experiment with ideas and musical sketches for upcoming projects. The results are oddly listenable, though sometimes uneven, records that are refined in their strangeness. Feels is far and away the best and most unbroken illustration of this technique in Animal Collective's otherwise intermittently brilliant repertoire. For a record that places giddy, bizarre pop beside long, contemplative stretches, Feels goes down smoothly. Gone are the spaced-out, entirely too soporific 12-minute works that brought previous albums to a dead halt. The longest track here, "Banshee Beat," clocks in at around eight minutes and propels you through Feels' quieter, delicate second half with its surprising use of a clear, blatant melody. -- Eric Phillips

Ween  -  - Shinola Vol. 1  - Chocodog The brothers Ween, however - unrelated, provide the world with off-the-wall music as - hip-shaking as it is confounding. After 2003's mildly - disappointing Quebec (sort of Ween Lite), it's - good to see them back in full form with Shinola Vol. - 1, a collection of B-sides and rarities. As soon as - the opening "Tastes Good on th' Bun" clunks into gear, - it's clear that "B-sides" doesn't necessarily mean "crap - outtakes." Sure the boys never say anything beyond - those titular five words, but they never need to. The - hyper-boppy "Boys Club" is hilarious, with Michael - McDonald-inspired vocals, and "Big Fat Fuck" is a heavy - space-funk favorite. As with their previous Chocolate - and Cheese, Ween still prove themselves bigger - than their goof personae, always aceing the genres they - emulate, whether jokingly or not (see the Thin Lizzy - ringer "Gabrielle"). -- Kara Luger
  • Ween

    Shinola Vol. 1
    Chocodog

    The brothers Ween, however unrelated, provide the world with off-the-wall music as hip-shaking as it is confounding. After 2003's mildly disappointing Quebec (sort of Ween Lite), it's good to see them back in full form with Shinola Vol. 1, a collection of B-sides and rarities. As soon as the opening "Tastes Good on th' Bun" clunks into gear, it's clear that "B-sides" doesn't necessarily mean "crap outtakes." Sure the boys never say anything beyond those titular five words, but they never need to. The hyper-boppy "Boys Club" is hilarious, with Michael McDonald-inspired vocals, and "Big Fat Fuck" is a heavy space-funk favorite. As with their previous Chocolate and Cheese, Ween still prove themselves bigger than their goof personae, always aceing the genres they emulate, whether jokingly or not (see the Thin Lizzy ringer "Gabrielle"). -- Kara Luger

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