May 23, 2017 Slideshows » News

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Tree fight in Stratton Open Space 


Pam Zubeck
Trees marked with a blue dot, like this one, will be saved, whereas others are destined for the axe.
Pam Zubeck
Vegetation enfolds Stratton Springs at the Stratton Open Space, and mitigation here has been postponed indefinitely.
Pam Zubeck
Three of the four pine trees shown here would be cut down.
Pam Zubeck
Open Space advocate Kent Obee stands next to a place where city crews wiped out a Rocky Mountain Maple grove.
Pam Zubeck
The backdrop behind Obee here leads into the Stratton Springs shaded area that will be left alone, for now.
Pam Zubeck
After mitigation, Stratton Open Space has a more open feel.
Pam Zubeck
A recent snow emphasizes the spacing of trees after mitigation.
Pam Zubeck
Looking down on a mitigated area from a reservoir, the thinning of trees is apparent.
Pam Zubeck
A closer look at the spacing of trees following restoration.
Pam Zubeck
Masticators that chewed through foliage left ruts that resemble a road, although a light snow tends to conceal the tracks left behind.
Pam Zubeck
What's left from masticators, tank-like vehicles that chop as they go.
Pam Zubeck
Not all bushes and scrubs have been sacrificed during the mitigation.
Pam Zubeck
A view of Stratton Open Space that demonstrates how the mitigation created gaps from which hikers and cyclists can see great distances.
Pam Zubeck
Open Space advocate Kent Obee calls this area a ponderosa pine monoculture, which city forester Dennis Will says is more true to a natural forest than the growth that had invaded over a century of fire suppression.
Pam Zubeck
Another view of the monoculture forest.
Pam Zubeck
Obee walks a trail through what once was a lush tangle of woods.
Pam Zubeck
The aftermath of masticators coming through the Stratton Open Space to mitigate for fire danger.
Pam Zubeck
This area hasn't yet been mitigated.
Pam Zubeck
A portion of the Stratton Open Space trail that hasn't been treated yet.
Pam Zubeck
Grass seed has been scattered in this area after mitigation, but Obee sees the sign as rather ironic in light of the vegetation that's been removed during the mitigation process.
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Pam Zubeck
Trees marked with a blue dot, like this one, will be saved, whereas others are destined for the axe.
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